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Sunscreen for sailing
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The Publisher
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Mar 17, 2009, 11:19 AM

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What is the best sunscreen for sailing? Scuttlebutt asked some of the people who are regularly on the water. America's Cup winner Russell Coutts uses whatever his wife gives him, and Olympic Gold Medalist Anna Tunnicliffe finds success with most everything that is 50+ SPF and waterproof. Here is some of the other feedback we received:

* Greg Fisher, J/22 World Champion: “I like Neutrogena Ultra Sheer SPF 55 sun block as it is less sticky and doesn't burn the eyes as readily as some of the other stuff. It's not totally waterproof but I've been told that you need to reapply every few hours anyway for any sunscreen to remain effective. I've tried some other sunscreens that claim to have "anti-wrinkle" properties. They don't seem to have quite the screen qualities as the Neutrogena nor do they seem to actually turn back the clock on what the sun has already accomplished!"

* Paige Railey, 2006 Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year: “I use a sunscreen called Roc for babies. The reason I prefer it is because it's a mineral cream. I always wear rashguards so the only thing exposed to the sun is my face. The sunscreen is so thick that it makes my skin white. It looks like I wear zinc on my face. When it starts to wear off then the color will start to fade. So I reapply. This is the reason why I look like a ghost in all of my pictures. I use the same for my lips. I need to protect them because when I was younger I never cared for them so now I have had two spots removed. Let’s say I take the sun very seriously!”

* Zach Railey, 2008 Olympic Finn Silver Medalist: “I use sunscreen called Ocean Potion. SPF 30. It is very waterproof and also sweat proof for hot weather. I think it was originally designed for surfers.”




ibsailn
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Mar 18, 2009, 6:37 AM

Post #2 of 36 (111133 views)
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Gram Schweikert: Bullfrog Quickgel 36....or as my friends call it "Sun Away!!!" VERY waterproof and alcohol based (rough after a late evening) so it isn't oily at all.


BetsyAltman
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Mar 18, 2009, 7:44 AM

Post #3 of 36 (111111 views)
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Like so many of us, I have struggled to find sun goo that is wearable and reliable. I am really happy with a product I have used for the last 4-5 years. It isn't a matter of branding, which brand you like the marketing of. It is a matter of the protection from the sun provided by the product. It is essential to have both UVA and UVB protection with Anthelios with Mexoryl XL (long lasting). I find this product marketed as LaRoche Posay, available online and at CVS stores at the prescription counter. I order online to get the under 3 ounce size (so I can fly with it and it fits in my pocket on the boat) and so I can get 60 SPF (which just means I don't have to reapply as often). The other option is zinc oxide which is being mixed with creams to apply easier and to hide its telltale white color. Dermatologists say you can use whatever you want so long as they have zinc oxide or Anthelios with Mexoryl.


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Mar 18, 2009, 1:24 PM

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* Bill Hardesty, 2008 Etchells World Champion: “My sun block of choice is Hawaiian Tropic 60+. It’s very thick and starts out white. Eventually it absorbs and turns clear. Its ultra waterproof, doesn't rub off, and one application is usually enough. I try to avoid alcohol based sun block or anything that irritates my eyes. Spray block seems to be popular but I have found it is thin and wears off quickly. I see most people first spray on their hand and then apply to the face. I prefer the more traditional types.”

* Morgan Larson, professional sailor: “In the past i used Coppertone Water Babies (in the pink bottle). My dermatologist (who i see every 6 months) is now recommending Neutrogena that comes in a SPF 45 and 75. I recently used it in Miami and it seemed to be really good. The best lip protector was an Australian "sunstick" called Aquasun SPF 30 but nobody seems to be able to find it anymore.”

* Morgan Reeser, professional sailor/Olympic medalist and coach: “I use ‘COTZ’...available at totalblock.com which contains only Titanium and Zinc. Because of a dermotologist's recommendation that I use sunblock without "parabins" and "propolyne glycol". My dermatologist said that I was as likely to get skin cancer from these two chemicals as I was from the sun.”




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Mar 18, 2009, 1:47 PM

Post #5 of 36 (111069 views)
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From Bill Munster:

After being a "Bronze God" for over 50 years and just finishing my second face-acid peel, my dermatologist said the very best sunscreen is "Vanicream SPF 60"...it is available at Costco in the pharmacy section...we'll see if it works.




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Mar 19, 2009, 12:09 PM

Post #6 of 36 (110888 views)
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From Sean 'Doogie' Couvreux:

For bow guys, I recommend wearing long sleaves. The Patagonia capilene works well. Because bow guys are always packing sails, and wrapping their arms around stuff, most sunscreen rubs off. The long sleeves protect from wear and do a good job keeping the sun off.




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Mar 19, 2009, 3:11 PM

Post #7 of 36 (110860 views)
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* Terry Hutchinson, 2008 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year: “I have found that for everybody it is different. I use a brand that is made in Australia called Sunsense 30. Interestingly enough it is not sold in the U.S. Because it contains too much titanium dioxide and is not approved by the FDA. I also use zinc oxide on the nose and lips. Others on board the boats I sail like the Coppertone sport 30 or the Neutrogena 50. The other thing that I have learned through the years that is quite important is applying in the morning before I go out and have not started sweating. I find the sunscreen works a lot better if you actually follow the instructions. For arms, I run the Gill long sleeve capilene shirts. They are light and provide 50 SPF.”

* Kenny Read, Volvo Ocean Race skipper: “On PUMA'S il mostro, we have been running a brand new sunblock called Z Blok. A company recently formed in Rhode Island, but has been doing research for 10 years. They came to me with an idea: If they could eliminate eye stinging from sunblock and upgrade the UV protection as well as do it odour free, would we be interested in trying it out? I thought, can the stuff also drive fast in a big breeze?

“So we tried it on Rambler last year in the Buenos Aires to Rio race and low and behold the stuff did what they said it would. It is key for boats like this to have the non stinging part because we are almost always wet on deck. The UV protection is nothing short of fantastic. And we don't smell like perfume. All good. So thank you Z blok. You have certainly made our lives a lot more bearable as we cross the equator 4 times in this race.

“As far as I know they have started selling this at local stores like Team One in Newport, but they are beginning to ramp up for mass production soon if not now. I think they have a web site Zbloksun.com for more info if people are interested. Pretty psyched we made this choice for such a key item.”


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Mar 22, 2009, 11:29 AM

Post #8 of 36 (110548 views)
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From Stacey Szabo:

Great topic this week on scuttlebutt. Not to contradict your stories this week but this is an interesting news clip (45 minutes) a fellow swimmer forwarded me. Finding sunscreen might not be effective. This lecture that was just on UCSD TV and can be streamed here: http://www.ucsd.tv/search-details.asp?showID=15770


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Mar 22, 2009, 5:14 PM

Post #9 of 36 (110530 views)
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* Chris Larson, 1997 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year: “Growing up in Florida, I was exposed to the sun from an early age. I’ve had my share of “AK’s” actinic keratosis (pre-cancers), and biopsies. In addition, I had a full lip ‘laser’ resurfacing and Efudex treatment, a "topical chemotherapy" chemical face peel. Trust me; these are not things you want to experience.

“I currently use Coppertone Sport 50 SPF breathable sunscreen and have always come back to Coppertone products over the years. It just seems to work best for me. Sunscreens work differently on each individual due skin type and makeup. Trial and error is the best way to find something which gives you the most protection.

“Application is ABSOLUTLEY the most important factor in sun protection. I have a morning ritual of taking a shower and then immediately applying 3-4 coats of sunscreen. Heat and moisture from the shower open skin pours allowing it to absorb significantly more product. This method covers me for the whole day. Applying sunscreen on the boat just doesn’t cut it and I inevitably come away with too much sun.

“In addition, Lip protection is a must. Zinc Oxide is the best for ultimate protection; however any lip balm w/ a SPF over 30 will work. Lastly, it’s important to see your dermatologist every 6 months.”




RickS
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Mar 23, 2009, 8:30 AM

Post #10 of 36 (110451 views)
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I'd like to draw everyone's attention to a great new sunscreen, called Soleo Organics All Natural Sunscreen. Soleo is taking the surfing world by storm, and if it's great for those watermen, why not the sailing community? As I understand it, Soleo works better than any existing sunscreen out there (including everything that's been mentioned in this thread), but does so WITHOUT CHEMICALS or SYNTHETIC PRESERVATIVES. Soleo is organically sourced and is also biodegradable, so it won't harm marine environments. Check out www.soleousa.com. It was also just ranked as the safest water resistant sunscreen available according to Skin Deep (www.cosmeticsdatabase.com), which looks at all of them!


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Mar 23, 2009, 8:36 AM

Post #11 of 36 (110449 views)
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In Reply To
I'd like to draw everyone's attention to a great new sunscreen, called Soleo Organics All Natural Sunscreen. Soleo is taking the surfing world by storm, and if it's great for those watermen, why not the sailing community? As I understand it, Soleo works better than any existing sunscreen out there (including everything that's been mentioned in this thread), but does so WITHOUT CHEMICALS or SYNTHETIC PRESERVATIVES. Soleo is organically sourced and is also biodegradable, so it won't harm marine environments. Check out www.soleousa.com. It was also just ranked as the safest water resistant sunscreen available according to Skin Deep (www.cosmeticsdatabase.com), which looks at all of them!



Warning: The post above came from someone who has the same email address as soleusa.com. Hmm! Please let's not turn this thread into a commercial.

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt


RickS
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Mar 23, 2009, 8:53 AM

Post #12 of 36 (110443 views)
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I certainly understand and don't intend to do so, I just am trying to spread the word. My apologies!


Shannon Bush
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Mar 23, 2009, 1:45 PM

Post #13 of 36 (110402 views)
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Shannon Bush: People make fun of my white "war paint," but I am a firm believer in total block. I wear long sleeve shirts with high collars to start. Every morning, after brushing my teeth, I apply Neutrogena Ultra Sheer 70 (I never buy anything below 55). After that dries, I make the first of two applications of a new product I got from my skin nazi, Solbar (available on line) with Zinc Oxide and Titanium Dioxide. I put this on thick and it dries to a pale white. Once on the water, I go for my favorite stand-by: straight Zinc Oxide. I hate alcohol based products because my skin is very sensitive. I wear a hat religiously and never apply this stuff above the mid-eye line, as it always sweats into my eyes. For as much time in the sun as I have put myself through, and recently been carved into like a piece of steak, I'll take the war paint any day.


windward
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Mar 23, 2009, 2:04 PM

Post #14 of 36 (110398 views)
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Has anyone considered that the normal oil on your skin is the best sunscreen and that's why it's there before you wash it away with soap? Nature has a way of solving most problems and she's been working on this one much longer than the cosmetic companies.


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Mar 23, 2009, 5:00 PM

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* Kevin Burnham, 2-time Olympic medalist: “Been through a lot of treatments. Lip laser burn that left my lips open and raw for weeks. Face peels with Efudex and numerous direct hits with the laser on various parts of my body. I had both eyes operated on from the sun burning them and creating pterygiums that had to be removed.

“I use the sunscreen called Aloegator that is made in Irving, Texas. I use the Kids SPF 45 cream that soaks into the skin. They have another SPF 45 that is a gel that causes me to sweat. The kids stuff does not burn the eyes either. The technique is to start with a shower in the morning and apply the first application, as soon as I get out and dry off. For my lips, I use Zinc oxide PASTE - not ointment. This stuff is mixed with a wax of some sort and stays on much better than the ointment. I order kilo jars of it from the pharmacy. When I am not on the water I use Neutrogena 30 lip balm. It is clear and does a good job. I am now wearing Patagonia gloves for my hands, while driving the car and on the water in Miami. It is SPF 30 and they do a good job. My hands have become a real concern due to the thinness of the skin there.

“All and all I believe that the most damage was as a child growing up three houses from the beach in Florida (in the 60’s/70’s). They did not have sun protection back then and I was always one huge blister in the summers. I think that if we had the sunscreen lotions that we have now, I would not have incurred so much sun damage to my skin. I feel that down the line I will be treated for serious melanoma problems. My skin type was never meant to be in the tropics and my love of the water combined, makes for a deadly combination.”


ahhooker
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Mar 23, 2009, 8:24 PM

Post #16 of 36 (110367 views)
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I have been sailing and racing on Lake Ontario for over half a century. In spite of the fact that our season is only half of the year, skin cancer is very prevalent. With the thinning ozone layer near the poles, I burn easier at latitude 43 degrees than I do in the Virgin Islands. Unfortunately, sunscreen didn't exist the first half of my sailing career. I am now paying the price with biopsies every three months, Efudex treatments. and a back that looks like a chart of the Thousand Islands. Hawaiian Tropic Ozone 70 or H.T. Sport 60 applied generously & early in the day have slowed down my frequency of basal, squamous cell, and malignant melanoma. Get checked regularly by your dermatologist and apply your sunscreen early (at least an hour before going into the sun). Andrews H. Hooker, Youngstown YC (NY)


Annie Buchanan
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Mar 24, 2009, 8:11 AM

Post #17 of 36 (110184 views)
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I grew up sailing at SDYC and have had my own share of skin cancers. I am currently a licensed esthetician and the clients I see the most damage on are the guys who sail and either don't use enough sunscreen or don't apply it properly. Most people forget to apply on their ears which are often the most exposed. As someone else commented, its so important to apply before you leave the house! And carefully, to cover every area. I have suffered from numerous basal and squamous carcinomas between my eyes and now have a huge one inch scar right between my eyebrows from the numerous surgeries required to remove the cancers. Yuck!


The Publisher
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Mar 24, 2009, 9:21 AM

Post #18 of 36 (110158 views)
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I have posted online some information that was provided by Dr. Walter K. Nahm, who is my wife's dermatologist: http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/...9/sunscreen/file.pdf

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt


Tink
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Mar 25, 2009, 7:28 AM

Post #19 of 36 (108872 views)
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Growing up in the harsh sun of New Zealand spending summers on the beach and sailing without any hat or sunscreen, then delivering and racing boats full time for several years often through the tropics has resulted in my going through several very uncomfortable Efudex treatments. I have also endured excisions I do not care to count of basal and squamous cells from my head, face, back, arms and legs. I now use an Australian product AquaSun 30+ not available in the US but I find it on-line and order two 500 ml pump bottles at a time. I apply it after showering and it absorbs well, is non greasy, water resistant and does not sting the eyes. The key is to start using sunscreen as soon as you are old enough get exposure to prevent the early damage. I do not think the brand is too important as long as it contains the right ingredients to offer adequate protection and is comfortable to use.


cyates
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Mar 25, 2009, 8:38 AM

Post #20 of 36 (108836 views)
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Dermatone makes great sunscreen used by athletes in all different elements. They are waterproof, sweatproof and have some products with Zinc (not like the 80's Zinc) that rubs in clear. You can't buy it drug stores but at most outdoor stores (think EMS, REI, Darien Sports, ski shops etc). There products aren't greasy and have some that also help prevent windburn, chapping and frostbite!!!
Their website has a lot of info www.dermatone.com
The spf 36 with Z-cote lotion(Zinc) is one I recommend most!


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Mar 25, 2009, 9:30 AM

Post #21 of 36 (108807 views)
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From Andrew Bray, Yachting World editor:

Like many of your other correspondents I am fair skinned and burn easily. When I started sailing in the 1960s my perpetually-peeling nose was treated as a bit of a joke but in the years since I have taken sun protection much more seriously, especially after I had to have a biopsy recently.

The sun does sometimes shine in the UK but as I also do a lot of sailing in warmer waters I have experimented with many different sun screens. None was perfect, most washed off too easily but about three years ago I came across Riemann P20 Sunfilter which ticks all the boxes. I'm surprised no-one else has mentioned it. Maybe it's not available in the USA.

It may be only spf20 but it needs only one application a day, dries in seconds, is non greasy and is waterproof - I can happily swim and not re-apply without burning. In the last three years I have used it when sailing in the Grenadines, BVI and the Bahamas. It's also good for skiing.


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Mar 25, 2009, 4:55 PM

Post #22 of 36 (108693 views)
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From Tom Anderson:

One argument for the use of sun screen when on the water, that finally got my immortal kids attention, is that liberal use of sun screen (and sun glasses) will help preserve the bodies energy. Who couldn't use some more energy after a long day on the water?


acierno
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Mar 26, 2009, 6:15 AM

Post #23 of 36 (108552 views)
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I use the LUCA products ( http://www.lucasunscreen.com ) . They have the highest level of UVA protection on the market, even higher than the Neutrogena's Helioplex and L'Oreal's Mexoryl formulations. UVA rays do not produce a sunburn, but instead are the cause of sun induced melanoma and solar aging. i for one don't want my face to look like a worn out saddle, at least not from UVA exposure. LUCA also has a new spray on zinc formulation, called Critical Wavelength that is really light and very sweat and water proof. It is perfect for water sports.


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Mar 26, 2009, 8:55 AM

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From Ray Tostado, San Pedro, CA:

I am totally sympathetic to those who suffer from the effect of UV, sunshine, upon their exposed body parts. I can only submit that as some often lament about picking better parents, the most predictable cause of skin cancer is genes; as in many other cancer expressions. At my age after having spent 45 years on open air Hollywood filming, skied 100 days a year, and sailed what time remained, my condition is not one of immunity, but of good family genes. I say this because all persons who intend to sail under the sun should take the time to inquire about any family trends toward such UV sensitivity. If it "runs in the family", then take the utmost caution in protection. I have had too many friends who even in their 30s predicted their demise to cancer. "It's in the family." they would state frankly. And to the man, and woman, they have encountered cancer. Take the time to study family; and as important take the time to study what legitimate precautions exist. There are sham lotions, and poor cloth fabrics. Neither of which help at all. Take the time and read up. Today, our government is not being responsible in the information offered to the public regarding the increasing UV intensity.


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Mar 26, 2009, 12:24 PM

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http://images.google.com/...nUS307US309%26sa%3DN




Weekend Warrior
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Apr 15, 2009, 10:02 AM

Post #26 of 36 (106950 views)
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This topic struck a resonant chord with me because I've spent too many years in the sun sailing and skiing. Used to get burned to a crisp as a kid, blisters and all.

Sailing is especially tough on fair skinned people like myself; too much UVA & B comes from not only the sun but is reflected off water and sails. In recent years I've also had several sailing friends diagnosed with skin cancer too, and one even died from it.

Recently my dermatologist remove a couple things that he said looked "bad". I nervously awaited the lab results which, thankfully, indicated that they were not malignant. It was a wake up call however, with the dermatologist adding for good measure "Don't go out in sun the without good sunscreen on." Got it.

I thought we should have a high quality sunscreen available through OceanRacing.com and now we do. Its SPF 58, water resistant, mineral based, chemical free and full spectrum UVA & B. It more expensive than the drug store brands but it's good stuff. We've got some SPF 45 lip balm that moisturizes and protects too. http://www.oceanracing.com/product.php?cid=200



Some background information on sunscreen, SPF & the like can be found at http://www.oceanracing.com/faqs.php.

The bottom line is these days we're well aware of the risks and there is wide selection of good sunscreen products to choose from. The important thing is to pick one and use it. My dermatologist said to use it like you were voting in Chicago; apply it early and often.

Good Sailing,

G. E. Kriese
OceanRacing.com
G. E. Kriese
www.OceanRacing.com





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Apr 27, 2009, 1:57 PM

Post #27 of 36 (105761 views)
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Sunsreen review on MyBoatsGear.com: http://www.myboatsgear.com/...duct.asp?prodID=1764

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt


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Apr 29, 2009, 9:26 AM

Post #28 of 36 (105642 views)
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Three articles by Lynn Fitzpatrick that were included in Scuttlebutt:

The Reality of being a Fair-Skinned Sailor: http://www.worldregattas.com/...fo.php?ContentID=215

Indespensable Sunscreen Tips: http://www.worldregattas.com/...fo.php?ContentID=218

Screening for Skin Cancers: http://www.worldregattas.com/...fo.php?ContentID=219

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt




The Publisher
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Apr 29, 2009, 9:29 AM

Post #29 of 36 (105640 views)
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A letter sent to Scuttlebutt from Lynn Fitzpatrick:

Thank you for publishing the recent skin cancer articles. Both Dr. Horwitz and I have received a tremendous amount of positive feedback. I’d like to share parts of exchanges with two Olympians – USA’s Athens Yngling crew, Liz Merrifield Filter and GBR’s Athens Europe Dinghy sailor, Laura Baldwin.

From Liz – “I am dealing with my own issues (sliced and diced just yesterday by the dermatologist) so I don’t think you can have too much publicity about this issue!

I am currently organizing the Melges24 Worlds (this October in Annapolis) and have decided to do a free screening for our regatta participants. I have identified the doctor who has done this for the PGA…”

From Laura – “I am recovering from having a cancerous mole cut off my foot. I'm 29 and have dark skin, brown hair & eyes so don't fit the usual 'high risk category'. My life-style however, sailing full time for eight years, following the sun, avoiding winter and neglecting to put sun screen on my feet has resulted in 7 stitches and two weeks on dry land. I guess I should be lucky as it could have been a lot worse!

It's a bit ironic really that I get this as in 2007 I was the face of Sail 4 Cancer's 'Keep it in the Dark' campaign to gain skin cancer awareness within the sailing world. After representing GBR in the Athens Olympics in 2004 I was asked to be an ambassador of the Charity. I'm happy to be made an example of to help event others suffering the same or worse.”

Laura is also a motivational speaker and would be a great addition to every yacht club events calendar.

I applaud Liz and Laura for stepping up to the plate so quickly and hope that others will follow their example and help our community to become more aware of a very real danger to our health and well being.

All the Best,

Lynn Fitzpatrick
World Regattas
Raising the Profile of Sailing and Sailors
www.WorldRegattas.com


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Jun 29, 2010, 3:26 PM

Post #30 of 36 (88097 views)
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SPF INFLATION IN THE SUNSCREEN AISLE
(June 27, 2010) - Do you get significantly better sun protection from lotion with a SPF rating over 30? Something strange is happening in the sunscreen aisle. Shelves that had been stocked with bottles claiming an SPF, or a sun protection factor, of 30 now trumpet SPFs of 55, 70, even "110+." This not-so-subtle escalation often comes with corollary pricing. Higher SPFs frequently cost more, but are they worth it? Many dermatologists don't think so.

"Once you get to SPF 50, it's really getting silly," said Boston dermatologist, James Spencer. "SPF refers to multiples of how much longer it takes the skin to burn," but it isn't a linear progression. An SPF of 30 doesn't offer twice as much protection as an SPF of 15, for example. An SPF 15 blocks 94% of UVB rays, SPF 30 blocks 97%, and SPF 45 blocks 98%.

Spencer recommends sunscreens with an SPF of 30, as does the American Academy of Dermatology, "because we know you're not going to put enough on."

In fact, the academy found that most sunscreen users put on only half as much sunscreen as they should to get the product's claimed SPF protection. Making matters worse is the fact that sunscreen doesn't last all day and needs to be reapplied every few hours.

The Food and Drug Administration began requiring SPF ratings on sunscreens sold in the U.S. in 1978. But SPF ratings only measure one type of sun protection. Sunlight consists of about 95% UVA, the ultraviolet light that contributes to skin cancer and wrinkles, and 5% UVB, which is responsible for sunburn. SPF only applies to UVB. It does not indicate UVA protection.

While many sunscreens claim to be broad spectrum — protecting the skin from both UVB and UVA — there's no way of knowing how much UVA protection is included in a sunscreen. Yet. This October, the Food and Drug Administration "intends to publish rules to address sunscreen formulation, labeling and testing requirements for both ultraviolet B and ultraviolet A protection," according to FDA spokeswoman Shelly Burgess. -- LA Times, http://www.latimes.com/features/image/la-ig-spf-20100627,0,2361398.story




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Jul 9, 2010, 6:18 AM

Post #31 of 36 (87077 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Posted elsewhere by P Fleming:

Our government has done a lot of research on sunscreen. The important facts are in a report called "The Burning Facts" by the EPA which you can easily "Google". The salient points are:
- SPF over 30 is a waste of your money and SPF only measures protection from UVB rays, not cancer causing UVA rays (it is actually illegal in Australia to claim an SPF over 30 for that reason).
- The only active sunblock ingredient that provides "extensive protection" from both UVA and UVB rays is zinc oxide

Separately, I happened to be in a dermatologists office today and an American Academy of Dermatology poster stated that 80 % of skin damage is typically done by the time you are 18 years old. Protect your kids early!

In the interests of full disclosure, I am Managing Partner in Z Blok sunscreen which has zinc oxide. So if on doubt read "The Burning Facts" to get the real facts.




molly_spinsheet
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Jun 7, 2011, 6:32 AM

Post #32 of 36 (78737 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

What a great thread, thank you!

This is not a recommendation for a dinghy sailor but rather a big boat cruiser or someone else who is able to more easily reapply than a racer with an active job. There's a great product called Ti Silk, often recommended by dermatologists for patients with recent scars to cover. It's water-resistant not -proof, but it's gentler than many, especially for the face. Doesn't make me break out. Expensive. The marketers actually use the words "cosmetically elegant." I think of it as a girlie sunblock, because it's slightly tinted, not as bad as makeup, but maybe a bit much for some men. I wear it cruising with a sun hat on my face.

I'm a big fan of Neutrogena Ultra sheer 55+ for the rest.


The Publisher
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Jun 14, 2011, 11:15 AM

Post #33 of 36 (78397 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

NEW RULES ABOUT SUNSCREEN CLAIMS
(June 14, 2011) - After 33 years of consideration, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps on Tuesday to sort out the confusing world of sunscreens, with new rules that specify which lotions provide the best protection against the sun and ending claims that they are truly waterproof.

The F.D.A. said sunscreens must protect equally against two kinds of the sun’s radiation, UVB and UVA, to earn the coveted designation of offering “broad spectrum” protection. UVB rays cause burning; UVA rays cause wrinkling; and both cause cancer.

The rules, which go into effect in a year, will also ban sunscreen manufacturers from claiming their products are waterproof or sweatproof because such claims are false. Instead, they will be allowed to claim in minutes the amount of time in which the product is water resistant, depending upon test results.

And only sunscreens that have a sun protection factor, or SPF, of 15 or higher will be allowed to maintain that they help prevent sunburn and reduce the risks of skin cancer and early skin aging.

The rules have been under consideration since 1978, when “Boogie Oogie Oogie” was a hit on the radio and most beach lotions were intended to encourage tanning, not protect against it. But federal regulators said they had yet to decide whether to end an SPF arms race in which manufacturers are introducing sunscreens with SPF numbers of 70, 80 and 100 even though such lotions offer little more protection than those with an SPF of 50.

Still, dermatologists said they were thrilled. “Now, we’ll be able to tell patients which sunscreens to get,” said Dr. Henry W. Lim, chairman of dermatology at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit and a spokesman for the American Academy of Dermatology. -- NY Times, read on: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/15/science/15sun.html?_r=1&hp



The Publisher
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Jun 16, 2011, 9:59 AM

Post #34 of 36 (78288 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Submitted by Texan Shannon Bush, active Etchells skipper:

People have always made fun of my white face, but, when they find out why, all the laughing stops (full story below). I have been wearing sunscreen since I was about 5 or 6 years old and I have worn just about all of them available in the USA, some with disastrous results and some that actually worked, then they took it off the market because it killed a rat.

However, in the past few years, I have had a wide range of sailing rock stars come up to me and ask me for some sunscreen, saying I always have the best stuff! Whatever it takes to get you to put it on, I say. I hand stuff out like candy now and the white face is not as odd as it once was.

I have two sunscreen regimens: daily and race day. Both start in the morning after brushing the teeth.

Daily, I put on Neutrogena Ultra Sheer 55 with Helioplex. It dries clear and doesn't leave a greasy film or gloss on my skin. I am good to go for most of the day (driving carpool, running Super Mom errands, etc) as long as the sun exposure is at a minimum.

If it is a race day, the first layer is Neutrogena Pure & Free Baby 60+ with Purescreen. It is thicker and dries with a white hue. As soon as I am on the boat, I hit my face, neck and ears again with a new product I found (thank you Ed Furry) called California Baby, SPF 30 (found at Target and a few other places; look on-line). This is a super cool product that comes both in a lotion AND a stick (won't get all over your hands - I have both on board) and it had both zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. The lotion dries clear, but the stick stays white. The cool thing about the stick is that the sunscreen is very tacky and doesn't easily rub or sweat off. I whip the stick out about every hour and a half. If I "feel" the sun through these layers, I will go straight to the original zinc oxide (10% zinc, which I can only find the real deal at mom & pop drug stores now) or Zinka (25% zinc) which is a California company known for making Andre Agassi colored zinc back in the 1980's. This stuff is pasty and stays put...and doesn't taste too bad, either!

It's all about re-application and what you feel comfortable with. There are always people who say that too much zinc is bad for you. Well, so is a 4" scar on my cheek! My mantra is that, after all my surgery and the recent burning off my entire lower lip (thank you Dr Calvin Day!), if I can't see it on my face, it isn’t there!

So what prompted the diligence... read on:
I started having stuff burned off my face (just below where the sunglasses arms are on both sides) at 17. Mind you, I have already been wearing lots of sunscreen by this time, including the zinc from ear to ear (just over the nose, no chin). Then, I started having places on my lower lip and jaw and forearms. Four years ago, I found a clear spot on my jaw line, and then when I picked at it (thinking it was food or something!), it stung like a match burn and wouldn't stop bleeding.

I went in and ended up with a 1" scar needing eight stitches. Eight months later, the wound hadn't healed, so I went in and the same doctor said she didn't get it all out. I went to a plastic surgeon that specializes in the MOHS system and he cut my cheek wide open, resulting in the removal of the melanoma and leaving me with a thin 4" scar with 78 stitches. This prompted the full-on white out on my face.

Last December, as part of my three month visit to the dermatologist (every 6 mos I get a full body scan that is quite thorough, I can assure you!), he said my lower lip concerned him. Without really telling me what he was going to do, and with no numbing agent, he burned off the skin on my entire lower lip, inside and out. The pain is indescribable and the look was disgusting. It's all been worth it, though, to KNOW he got everything.

I really don't think people truly know or appreciate what happens to them on the water. Even if they have dark skin. THANK YOU for writing about this.





The Publisher
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Jun 22, 2011, 10:38 AM

Post #35 of 36 (78018 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Explaining Sunscreen and the New Rules
By Jane E. Brody, NY TIMES

Attention, sun lovers (and yes, that includes all who think they are adequately protected against the sun’s damaging rays): Nearly four years after announcing its intention to improve the labeling of sunscreens, the Food and Drug Administration has finally issued new rules that should help reduce the confusion that currently prevails when consumers confront the aisle-long array of products in most pharmacies.

But these rules will not take effect for another year (and for small manufacturers, two years). Meanwhile, everyone needs to know what to do now about preventing painful sunburns, disfiguring and deadly skin cancers and premature skin aging.

How high an SPF should one choose? Is SPF 60 really that much better than SPF 30? What does “broad spectrum” mean? Are all sunscreen ingredients equally effective? And equally safe?

And perhaps the most frightening question: Why has the incidence of melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers, doubled since sunscreens (as opposed to tanning lotions) became popular?

Read on: http://www.nytimes.com/...ody%20sun&st=cse


RessieGilla
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Sep 16, 2013, 11:30 PM

Post #36 of 36 (54317 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Sunscreen for sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Well for sailing is better you go for high SPF as far as possible and most important water proof sunscreen block as being in water to need to protect your skin from tanning and getting damage too. So better prefer buying it from Beauty products Suppliers as keep clinically tested products that doesn’t harm your skin in any way.


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