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Cabarete Training Center - Laser boat handling DVD
Team McLube

 



The Publisher
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Sep 23, 2008, 5:38 PM

Post #1 of 5 (9783 views)
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The Laser Training Center in Cabarete, Dominican Republic played host to Olympic Gold Medalist Anna Tunnicliffe and 16 other athletes that competed at the 2008 Olympic Games, providing equipment, coaching, and ideal sailing conditions, The center is now in the final stages of producing a Laser boat handling DVD to allow the everyday sailor to see and learn from the same footage the Pros use to get even better. However, they are faced with some translation issues, and are struggling to find words or terms that exist in many other languages, but not in English.

One of the issues they face is for the many uses of the English word ‘luff’. An example is that the leading edge of the sail is the luff, the opposite of bearing away is to luff, and when the leading edge of the sail is flapping the sail is luffing. Comments Ari Barshi of the Laser Training Center, “In English you can ask a person to luff (head upwind) but then scold him for luffing, as his sail is flapping with no force.”As a result, Ari is eager for alternate words to describe the flapping of the sail in the leading edge that is NOT luffing.

Ari is also looking for a word that describes a sudden and forceful extension of the body to windward. This is usually done when completing a tack in light and medium winds. Once done, the sailor sits back in the boat or begins to hike in continues mode. (By the ISAF Rule book the word is maybe Torque, but most people think of torque as a repeated fore and aft motion).

Reply here with your suggestions.


Tillerman
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Sep 23, 2008, 9:10 PM

Post #2 of 5 (9761 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Cabarete Training Center - Laser boat handling DVD [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

When I was teaching small kids to sail in Optimists, one of the little tykes must have also been confused about the multiple meanings of the word "luff". Either that or he misheard me. Because he always referred to the flapping of the sail in the leading edge as "fluffing".

As for that
"sudden and forceful extension of the body to windward" after a light or medium air tack, I've never seen a better proponent of the art than the 2008 Dominican Laser Olympic representative and Cabarete regular, Raul Aguayo. I propose that this movement should for ever after be known as a "Raul". You might even refer to the whole maneuver as a "Raul Tack".




stpetefreak
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Sep 24, 2008, 7:19 AM

Post #3 of 5 (9727 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Cabarete Training Center - Laser boat handling DVD [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I've described the luffing of the jib or main to new students as "a bubble" as that is how it first appears on the leading edge of the sails.

"Hard hike hike" might work for the extended roll tack that includes some kinetics.

Speaking of luffing, on a race to Havana some years back with my Russian friend Kuli, his wife, and my wife (now ex), the ladies were on duty for trim and helm. Kuli comes back to the cockpit and says, in his somewhat thick accent, "the sails are luffing, the sails are luffing..." The ladies look at each other and asked, "why are the sails laughing?"


rob overton
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Sep 24, 2008, 1:42 PM

Post #4 of 5 (9712 views)
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>> Ari is eager for alternate words to describe the flapping of the sail in the leading edge that is NOT luffing.

I think if I were Ari, I'd go the other way -- use another term for turning into the wind ("head up", "reach up", whatever) and keep the term "luff" for shaking the sails, because there's no other good term for the latter situation that I know. "Bubble" describes just the beginning of a sail luffing, I suppose, but other than the fact that nobody uses that term, how do you describe a boat sitting on the starting line, luffing her sails? Bubbling? I don't think so.

For what it's worth, when I was growing up on the East Coast of the US, we never used "luff" as an intransitive verb meaning "turn toward the wind". It was either a transitive verb -- "We luffed the other boat when she tried to pass to windward of us," or a verb meaning to let the sail shake, as in "Ease the sheet until the sail luffs, then trim it back in until the bubble goes away."


Tillerman
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Sep 24, 2008, 8:23 PM

Post #5 of 5 (9689 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Cabarete Training Center - Laser boat handling DVD [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

If other languages have different words for the many uses of the word "luff" in English, then why not use some of them in the video and so introduce more precision into sailing language for us poor English speakers? After all when we learn a musical instrument we pick up many Italian words that specify musical concepts for which there is no precise equivalent word in English.

Also I think there already is an English term for that "sudden and forceful extension of the body to windward". It's "body pump".



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