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Naval architecture/marine engineering??
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phoebe
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Oct 27, 2007, 9:11 AM

Post #1 of 11 (13324 views)
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I am heading off to university next year, and was planning to go into naval architecture/marine engineering (they seem to be interchangable?). I realized there are no degrees in canada. but a lot of Diplomas. what is the difference? the diplomas are 4 year courses at real universities. Degrees are in the us or gb. they are the same length, and seem to cover the same topics. but cost so much more with international fees. is there a difference?


bazt
**

Oct 29, 2007, 9:12 PM

Post #2 of 11 (13274 views)
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Re: [phoebe] Naval architecture/marine engineering?? [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Well, there are probably alot of opinions about this, but for me, Naval Architects deal with ships, hull forms and wave analyses on vessel structures. Marine engineers more typically deal with structures in the marine environment, docks, piers, wharves, breakwaters, wave attenuators, coastal processes, etc. Obviously there can be an overlap, but this is how I keep it straight.
As far as the difference in degrees, I can't help there.
feel free to contact me at Tim@bluewaterdesigngroup.com, if I can be of any help.

good luck at school!


Tony Thompson
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Oct 30, 2007, 4:02 AM

Post #3 of 11 (13251 views)
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If you are interested in a Naval Architecture degree program in Canada, contact Memorial University in St. John's NF. Our firm has hired several Naval Architects out of that program and they are well trained professionals. To the best of my knowledge it is the only degree granting program in Canada. The Marine Institute of Memorial offers a diploma program (3Years) in Naval Architecture with some transfer abilities into a degree program. A lot more details can be obtained by calling either of these institutions.

Tony


ibsailn
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Oct 30, 2007, 7:39 AM

Post #4 of 11 (13214 views)
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Most degrees will be in "Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering" That is what my degree reads (From Webb Institute). Naval Architecture deals with design of hull shape, interaction with the water (hydrostatics and hydrodynamics), propeller design, and structures. Marine Engineering deals with ship systems including machinery design and layout, pumps, cargo handling or deck equipment, and is generally systems engineering for marine craft. Most programs deal with both together as they are integral to total ship or yacht design. Design of coastal structures would be handled generally by specialized civil engineers, NOT "Marine Engineers" in the sense the author was referring. Although they may refer to themselves as Marine Engineers, and it would appear that is what batz does, when looking at NA/ME degrees, the ME part does not deal with coastal structures.

As far as the difference between degrees and diplomas and the difference between Canada and the US, I must plead ignorance on the Canadian Side. Options in the US for undergraduate work are mainly Webb Institute, Michigan, University of New Orleans, Virginia Tech, and somewhat of a program at Texas A&M I believe (maybe Texas Tech...sorry for confusing the two). Webb and Michigan are generally seen as a cut above the rest. MIT has a very good graduate program in Ocean Engineering, which is another variation on the NA/ME thing. It should be noted that Webb is free (full tuition scholarship for all students), but only open to US Citizens.

Good luck in your search, but realize that if you choose to do NA/ME to get into the pleasure craft side of things, you will be leaving a lot of money on the table compared to commercial shipping or other forms of engineering. Most of us are happy to make that sacrifice, but it can be tough.


The Publisher
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Oct 30, 2007, 8:56 AM

Post #5 of 11 (13203 views)
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From Jonathan Seller:




bpedlow
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Oct 31, 2007, 6:35 AM

Post #6 of 11 (13081 views)
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New York Maritime offers a degree in Naval Architecture and is highly regarded in the field (and well connected in the sailing world).

Webb in a great school, but is also only in the business of Naval Arch. It's a bold move to choose a school with only Naval Arch. when you're 18.

UC Berkeley offers an outstanding Marine Engineering graduate degree.


ibsailn
**

Oct 31, 2007, 8:35 AM

Post #7 of 11 (13063 views)
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Yes, sorry, I forgot the Service Academies. Naval Academy, Kings Point MMA, Suny Maritime, USCG Academy and I believe most of the other state Maritime academies offer NA/ME.

I thought UC Berkeley basically had shut down their graduate program sometime around 2000. I had been interested in going there, but had heard it was being dissolved.

As far as choosing Webb goes, yes, it is a big choice for an 18 year old to make, but the first two years in particular are a great basis for a Mechanical engineering degree and many have left Webb for MIT or other great schools after a year or two to find that the Webb training made MIT "easy".


The Publisher
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Oct 31, 2007, 11:35 AM

Post #8 of 11 (13035 views)
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* From Paul Miller, Professor of Naval Architecture, United States Naval Academy:
A good source for on-line information about technical careers in the marine industry, including links to many degree programs in the US and Canada, can be found at the Outreach WebPages on the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers website: http://www.sname.org/outreach.htm Currently only about 200 naval architecture students graduate each year in North America, but corporate recruiters estimate the demand is three or four times that.




Steve Dalzell
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Oct 31, 2007, 1:32 PM

Post #9 of 11 (13028 views)
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Re: [phoebe] Naval architecture/marine engineering?? [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

The other comments on this thread provide a lot of good information but seem to have concentrated on traditional Naval Architecture programs. While these are certainly a route into yacht design they may not be the most effective given that they tend to concentrate on ship design and there are real differences, especially if you are mostly interested in boats less than 24m (80') and even more so if sail boats are your real passion. This is not to denigrate the Naval Architecture degrees out there in any way (it's what I hold from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne) but just to point out that they may not be your best bet. Alternatives that really focus on small craft are the B. Eng.(Hons) Yacht and Powercraft Design at Southampton Solent University in the UK and bachelors in Yacht and Small Craft Design offered by the Universita degli Studi di Genova at their La Spezia campus. In common with most European programs these are three year courses, which might help financially.
Another alternative you might like to consider is the Design Program offered by the Landing School in Southern Maine. This is an extremely intense 10 month full time program entirely focused on preparing people to enter the small craft design industry. When I say intense I am not joking - students are expected to put in more than 2200 hours of study in the 10 months. Most of the students following the program already have a bachelors degree, often in mechanical or ocean engineering and use the School to make the transition to the small craft world. Given your age and the the wisdom of keeping things flexible, it might make sense to think about doing an engineering degree of some sort first and then specialising.
I hope this helps and wish you the very best of luck - it's a great industry to be part of.
(I should probably mention that I was a senior lecturer at Southampton until 2001, when I joined the Landing School as Design Program Manager).


Avantika0503
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Feb 11, 2019, 2:13 AM

Post #10 of 11 (4183 views)
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Marine engineering deals with the machinery onboard a ship. Naval Architecture deals with the design of ships. Marine engineers deal with the design and maintenance of machinery such as diesel engines, gas turbines, AC plants, RO plants, various types of pumps like sea water pumps, chilled water pumps, propellers, bow thrusters, rudders, diesel alternators etc fitted onboard the ship. The marine engineers mostly work onboard the ship.

Naval Architects design the ships and offshore structures. They decide the structural strength, the capacity of various machinery, the size of the ship etc. They also look into the repair of the ships. They don't have much role onboard a ship.
Civil Design


tocnaza
*

Mar 2, 2019, 10:14 AM

Post #11 of 11 (3839 views)
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If you are interested in a Naval Architecture degree program in Canada, contact Memorial University in St. John's NF. Our firm has hired several Naval Architects out of that program and they are well trained professionals. To the best of my knowledge it is the only degree granting program in Canada. The Marine Institute of Memorial offers a diploma program (3Years) in Naval Architecture with some transfer abilities into a degree program. A lot more details can be obtained by calling either of these institutions. porno svensk porr gays
TocnazaX





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