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Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear
Team McLube

 



The Publisher
*****


May 30, 2007, 1:01 PM

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To celebrate Father’s Day on June 17, let's take a moment to thank our dads, and if they helped you get into sailing, tell us how they did it. Click on the reply button in the upper right to submit your brief note (log-in required). Best letters will be reprinted in the Scuttlebutt newsletter, and all submissions will be eligible to win an Atlantis WeatherGear Grand Prix vest (below). Drawing held on June 8th.

Grand Prix Softshell Vest






Karen Yingling
*

May 30, 2007, 10:03 PM

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Thanks dad - your tenacity and willingness to take on mom's vehement opposition to boat ownership cultivated a love of sailing for me that provides not only recreation, but a meager living! Growing up sailing in the Chesapeake Bay - no matter that there was no wind in July and August- taught me not only the skills necessary to move a boat through the water but showed me that sometimes just sitting quietly, waiting for the wind to fill in, listening to the ballgame on the am radio with your family can fill your soul the way nothing else can.


chrisl
**

May 31, 2007, 5:12 AM

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Thanks Dad (and Mom) for wallpapering my room with Treasure Island wallpaper. It planted a seed within me that has drawn me to the water since I was little. I remember late nights looking at the pictures of the Hispaniola and pirates and reading the rhyme that began - 15 men on a dead man's chest... Thanks for letting me buy the coconut pirate heads when we went on vacation, and especially for letting me hang them in my room. I'm sure it wasn't the type of decoration you wanted.
Now at 40, I hope I can instill in my children a similar love of sailing (and coconut pirate heads).


TimPlatt
*

May 31, 2007, 6:57 AM

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I owe my lifelong passion for sailing to my father, who carried out his own father's legacy as a Navy man, sailing instructor, top-flight racer, yachting enthusiast, and ultimate sportsman. Even as he was winning all those races, he always gave credit to his crew, to his teachers, and to his fellow racers, who pushed him to get better every day. In his deliberate but carefully patient style, he nurtured his children to enjoy sailing and love the water, always making sure that we found the fun, even on the bad-weather days or when we lost a race. Still keeping it fun, Dad taught us, as pre-teens and beyond, about good-sportsmanship and teamwork, to go with practice, the racing rules, tactics, navigation, boat maintenance and repair, and the distinct pleasures and rewards of racing, cruising and day-sailing.

So here's a toast to my father: Thanks for the memories and the passion, Dad. You are a great teacher, and the world's best father. I strive to embody your standard of being an avid sailor, sportsman and instructor.


Kenny G
**

May 31, 2007, 6:57 AM

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I was a power boater, 100%. Crewed on fishing boats, loved high speed muscle boats. I lived in San Diego, parents in Phoenix. Dad had a Melges scow (M-16) he sailed with Mom on the lakes near the city. They spent a month each summer in San Diego always trying to get me to sail with them on their Hobie Cat they kept on the beach.

One summer day, about 35 years ago, Dad convinced me and a my roommate to try sailing the Hobie. He gave me a quick lesson and impressed why we can't go directly into the wind. I left the beach in front of their summer place around noon. It was a good breeze but not overwhelming. Doug and I sailed that cat for hours. Never took it back to my Dad. Beached it in front of our rental beach house. I was sleepless thinking about getting back out on the boat the next day. Finally took it back to its home late the second afternoon. I was hooked!

Dad and I owned a 1923, 45' Alden yawl together. We sailed as often as possible together. Did a couple of San Diego/Ensenada races and a lot of Ancient Mariner regattas. He was my best sailing partner, and best friend. I lost him 7 years ago and have never found a sailiing buddy that could replace him.

Thanks Dad, love ya.

KG



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad
judgment. Will Rogers





dmichaelis
*

May 31, 2007, 8:19 AM

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My parents were avid racers. In 1965 they were racing their Columbia Challenger. I was born in March. I was stowed down below at six weeks old, while they raced. They have told me that they would be on the race course in a light breeze and all of a sudden all the boats around would hear a baby crying. My Dad wouldn’t let my Mom go to tend to me because it would cause too much movement on the boat. After the next tack she would get me my bottle and all was well. In the 70’s my parents raced a Cal 20 . In the 80’s my Dad and I raced our Newport 30 until he was mugged and shot in 1985. He became a quadriplegic, still having full use of his right arm but partial control on his left. I stopped sailing until 1992. I started crewing for other people and didn’t realize how much I enjoyed sailing until I started doing it again. I bought a Catalina 27 in 1997 after my Mother passed away from cancer. I was able to talk my Dad into going sailing with me on the Catalina 27. We made a chair that he could sit in at the cabin entrance. He was able to trim the main in light wind and steer the boat by reaching behind him. We had a blast and started racing it in 2001. In 2003 he started getting the itch for a bigger boat. We now have a Schock 35 that we race competitively in the Southern California fleet. We both have a passion for sailing and I owe it all to my Dad. Thanks Dad, I love you!


annienelson
*

May 31, 2007, 8:20 AM

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Dear Dad,
Yesterday I went to a funeral for a good friend's Dad. He read a letter to his dad telling all the things he remembered about him that he loved and admired. As I listened and felt his pain, I knew you are lying in a hospital bed and I wonder of this time you will be OK. I told myslef I will write you a letter now, while you are alive, telling you hpw much I love you. I have always thanked you for giving me the gift of the love of the ocean, but I can never say it enough. Sort of like hearing someone say "I love you". You can never say it or hear it enough. So dad, today I will write you a long letter, but I share on this sailing forum with others how much I love you. Giving me a little pram and guiding me off the dock, then a Sunfish and letting me go play in the bay with friends or by myself, not pushing me to race because I hated it and wasn't very good anyway, and then after begging you to buy me a Hobie 16 you helping me get a loan to buy it myself. You knew that would make me love it that much more. Begging you to let me borrow your yacht so I could race with all my girlfriends and sisters and you coming along to make sure we didn't hurt it or ourselves. And I'll never forget meeting you for lunch after graduating from university and showing you my plan for racing in the SORC with my all female crew. You knew how much I loved the game you had shared with me but did you know I would run with it? I'm sorry I didn't use my degree that you paid for, but I know you are proud because while you had your health you came to every event that I entered, cheering from the dock, a tray with pina colodas or a bucket of champagne or a hug and a kiss to show how much you cared.
I miss those days dad, and whenver I race a big event, I think of you standing on the dock letting me sail.
How lucky can a girl be? You gave me life, courage, independence, and a love of nature that has guided me throughout my life. I am so lucky!
Thanks dad.
I love you,
annie


psuchunk
***


May 31, 2007, 8:40 AM

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    My father has been an impressing force all through my life. And it even goes back to a time when he was not upset about me not getting a permanent job after I graduated college with a double major... back to a time when our family used to go camping at lakes... back to a time when the sunfish was being towed behind the station wagon full of too much camping gear and my sister and I screaming at each other because 'she touched me!' and 'I have to go to eh bathroom.'

My father was the first person to take me out on a sailboat. But, I was three, and was only used for ballast on the little sunfish and tried not to get in the way of the bitter end of the main sheet. I don't vividly remember the trips... the only thing I remember is constantly fidgeting in my life vest because it was crowding up on my neck. But, my father told me the story of the one time he let me hold the main sheet and by not knowing what to do on a gybe, we capsized and the dagger board fell out and sank because I forgot to tie it off like he told me. I am fairly certain that the exact moment we both hit the water, and the dagger board dissappered into the depths of Deep Creek Lake, is the moment he decided to sell the sailboat.

15 years later, I called him one day during my freshman year at Penn State Behrend, in Erie, and told him I was thinking about joining the sailing club there. He did what dads usually do, and told me that it was a good idea and was proud that I was getting involved. He told me that he had always loved sailing, and glad I was taking it up. He told me that one of the biggest regrets in his life was letting his interest in the sport diminish, and was happy to hear that my interest in the sport was increasing. So, I joined up, and went out on the club's keelboat during the Wednesday Night Races out on Presque Isle Bay. I only brought the experience of flipping a sunfish when I went aboard, but by the end of the night, I was trimming and working the winches, and really enjoying myself. I spent the rest of the year in the Behrend Sailing Club, spent the winter as a voilunteer maintenance worker on the tall ship US Brig Niagara, crewed aboard the Niagara that summer, taught my cousin to sail, become an Executive Board Memeber in the Penn State Sailing Club when I transferred to main campus after my freshman year at Behrend... eventually I was elected Commodore... and have gone on countless regattas and taught club memebers to sail our fleet of FJ's.

I love sailing now... and have my father to thank for letting me flip the sunfish for that. One of the best secret pleasures I enjoy is watching the Ameirca's Cup matches at 8:30 in the morning with him. (And for a recent college graduate, getting up at 8AM is tough, believe me.) I put on a pot of coffee, and sit on the couch with my father taking in the tacks, and gybes, and prestarts, and spinnaker sets. We both just sit there. Sometimes he asks me a question about the rules, or strategy of the boats because he never raced and sometimes gets confused about the particulars of match racing. So, I explain it to him, my hands up and crossing the air, illustrating the situations like they were boats and that somehow that makes everything easier to understand. Neveretheless, we just take it in, both sitting on the couch watching. And I couldn't be happier. I still fidget on the couch taking in the excitement of the prestarts and think about fidgeting on the the sunfish when I was younger. He took me out on a boat when I was younger which sparked my interest in the great sport we all love. And I hope he knows that my sailing experiences on tall ships and keelboats and dinghies makes me happy in the same way it made him happy to tool around on his sunfish and I have him to thank for that.





chuckhawley
**


May 31, 2007, 9:18 AM

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I was taught how to sail by my father, Melvin Hawley, when I was about 7 years old. At that time, Santa Cruz Harbor had yet to be dredged out of Arana Gulch, so we had to row an elderly El Toro out to a Mercury sloop, which was on a mooring near the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf. The Mercury was named Jill and was at one point half of a matched pair of Mercurys, Jack and Jill, until a YC member had put Jack on the beach.
There are a few aspects of these sails that are permanently etched in my mind. One was the lack of flotation in Jill, which my father would remind me of by saying that "she'd sink like a stone" if we were to make a mistake and allow the coaming to go under. My job, of course, was to tend the jib sheets during tacks and gybes, knowing that the slightest mistake could send Jill to the bottom of Monterey Bay.
I also remember the importance that Dad ascribed to the fetching of the mooring when we returned from our voyages. I would scramble onto the wet foredeck of the sloop and try to snag the slimy, kelp-infested mooring pendant with my hands; inevitably I would miss on the first try, and Dad would describe how everyone on the length of the wharf must be laughing uncontrollably at our ineptitude, and that how could I have missed such an obvious length of line? He'd utter a "goddammit" or two, and then we'd take another run at the mooring.
Based on these initial, occasionally terrifying sails, I became a lifelong sailor, and have made my career in the marine industry. Dad, who passed away a few weeks ago, was always a teacher, and while not always a believer in "constructive criticism", he exposed me to hundreds of skills and experiences which have shaped my life. I believe it's the highest purpose a person can have in life.
Chuck Hawley
Surprise, Alerion Express 38 Yawl


Cameron
**


May 31, 2007, 10:55 AM

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Clearly there are a lot of sailors out there who have a lot a Dads to thank, including me. However I wish to not only thank my Dad but all those other Dads that have shared their love of the sailing and the ocean with their children. Sailing has taught all of these kids valuable life lessons such as self- reliance, perseverance, endurance, autonomy and the importance of happy hour. To all the Dads for their years of on the water training they so cleverly camouflaged as fun, belly up, this round is on me!


BobJohnstone
*

May 31, 2007, 1:14 PM

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THE FATHER OF J BOATS

Dad with his 2 brothers and sister sailed a pair of 16' Scamp keelboats and a Herreshoff Fishers Island H23 (#8) called OJAI out of Stonington CT. He sailed in the finals of the Sears Cup in 1926. In June 1929, 4 months before the fateful October Crash, he sailed in an Intercollegiate Regatta in one of the Princeton boats. Intercollegiate Sailing started out as Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. For this particular event at the Seawanaka Corinthian YC they sailed S Boats. Harvard was a "no-show", so with some trepidation about watering down the quality of the regatta (according to the New York Times) Cornell was invited in Harvard's place. They needn't have worried; the Cornell skipper was Rod Stephens.

With one exception, "Yachting" for a young family was put on hold for 18 years due to the Depression and WW II. That exception was the annual Parent Child Race of the Wadawanuck YC in 1936. My Grandfather had donated the trophy, Dad was Jr. and I was III. I guess that Dad couldn't wait to get all 3 names on the trophy. I have no recollection of this, but am told that he decided to enter us in the race when I was 2 years old. This was a twice-around course. The parent could take the helm the first round and the child on the second (without the parent touching the helm). Story goes we had a huge lead after the first leg, then Dad, who had practiced this on me the day before, gave me the helm and proceeded to gently persuade me to "push" or "pull". Being a member of the terrible-twos, this process lasted a minute or two, then I simply said "NO!", refused to budge as the boat went in circles putting us into dead last. Several years ago, a psychologist friend concluded, "That explains everything! All your involvement with sailing and racing. You've been trying to make it up to your Dad ever since."

The Great Depression forced a hard scrabble existence on a young family. Dad was one of two engineers in his graduating class of 1932 to have a job.... his was for $10 per day slinging hash in an all-night diner in Newark NJ. Then the war came. After that ended, I guess he decided it was time to return to sailing with a full immersion project for all 4 of us kids plus Mom. This was 1946. I was 12 years old. We were going to build a Lightning in our garage in Glen Ridge NJ from a frame kit ordered from a fellow in Long Island, who was also a Class Measurer... fortunately, as it never would have passed muster if he hadn't felt sorry for us. PRODIGAL III #3310 was built of mahogany, varnished topsides, with a solid oak keel, canvas covered Masonite deck with heavy cast bronze/brass fittings and Merrimam mast hardware. The boat weighed at least 1,000 lbs (vs. Class minimum 700 lbs) and was probably 2" longer on the waterline than any other Lightning, because we couldn't fully bend the 1" oak keel board over the frames aft... even after constructing an elaborate steaming box (Dad was an engineer but not aeronautical) and punching a hole through the garage ceiling with a car jack pushing down on the keel board. I remember using real caulking irons pounding Kuhls caulking compound and cotton between the planks. I did such a good job that the boat swelled up after launching and closed the centerboard slot. Dad nearly killed himself on a marine railway trying to rout out the slot with an electric drill, but had the presence of mind to fall onto a metal rail to ground the drill.

This was total family immersion in sailing, definitely not the creation of leading edge racing equipment. With a 3-man crew, one was assigned to work the "step-on-it" bilge pump. To win a race, one had to pull every trick in the book (Bob Bavier's Sailing to Win), see every shift, play the current perfectly and trim those wrinkly nylon sails better than anyone else. It was a wonderful learning experience and great fun. I never regretted a minute of it. I can thank Dad for this gift of sailing.

Sadly, he passed away in 1966, 11 years before brother Rod and I founded J Boats, so never knew the legacy he left to the sport he loved. Or... maybe he does.

Bob Johnstone


thataway
**

May 31, 2007, 1:26 PM

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I went sailing on my dad's "unlimited 13" when I was one month old. (This was a 13 LOA foot hard chine centerboard, outboard rudder, with unlimited rig size.) I sailed on this boat for the first 5 years of my life. On my fifth birthday, my father asked what I wanted to do--and I said skipper a sailboat alone. The unlimited 13 was too much for a 5 year old to handle, so he rented a Skimmerette (a smaller version of the Rainbow Skimmer) in Alamitos Bay CA. After a check out sail, he had me bring the boat to the beach and jumped off. (Long before the bay was cut thru to the ocean and the Ocean Ave bridge was taken down.) During WWII, I learned boat construction technique as my father rebuilt his next boat--a 26 foot hard chine sloop. I worked along side with him every weekend. After the war the boat was put in the water at what is now 22 street landing in San Pedro. Virtually all of the gold platers of the day came thru this landing right after the war, since it was the first marina in the Los Angeles to be open to the public. I had the pleasure of meeting and spending hours with Harry Pigeon--the second man to solo circumnavigate. I also befriended John Caldwell who wrote the book "Perilous Voyage". The several early founders of Seven Seas Cruising Association were also moored near us. I had decided by 10 that I was going to spend most of my life involved with sailing. We raced with Little Ships fleet of Long Beach--and when I was age 13 my father had to go to Washington DC on business, and told me that I would be skippering the boat in the upcomming series. I was very proud to tell him I got first place when he returned. The two of us raced the 26 footer, including overnight races. There wasn't much room, aboard, but we did cruise the S. Calif. Islands. He taught me not only the technical parts of sailing very well, but the appreciation of the sea and nature. My father passed on 27 years ago, when I was fulfilling my dreams by cruising to Europe. I am sure that he vicariously lived his dream as I fulfilled mine. My father said that if there was re-incarnation he wanted to come back to life as a Pelican. Fortunately we live on a bay where we see pelicans every day--and I think of my dad and the precious gift of knowlege and motivation he gave to me. In 2002, my mother passed on and we mixed their ashes together and scattered them off Ship Rock, Catalina Island. Their first date in 1929 was on the "Great White Steamer" to dance at the Casino.


Alicia
***

May 31, 2007, 1:28 PM

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To my grandfather- Thank you for buying the motorboat and getting the family out on Boston harbor.
To my father-Thank you for deciding that gas is too expensive and spending $100 per afternoon was a rip off and buying windsurfers and then a sailboat. Thank you for getting me out on the great lakes and intercoastal waterway. ( not to mention the family Virgin islands trip)
I'm proud to be the biggest boat lover of my generation in our family.





SailTrim
*****

May 31, 2007, 1:40 PM

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Dear Dad,

Thank you for letting mom teach you how to sail, taking it on with a passion (so much so to write songs about such) and sharing that love with the rest of us kids. It took me a few years, a couple wrong turns but you and mom gave me sea legs before land legs and it only made sense I would find homage in the world of sailing during some challenging years. Thank you for planting the seed!

Here's to "wine-sipping" sailing on Cayuga Lake this summer!

Love always,

"Nifer-Lyn"


srm
*

May 31, 2007, 2:58 PM

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Dad introduced my brother and I to sailing in 1970. I was 9 and my brother 7. Our first boat was a Blue Jay, and we quickly adopted sailing as our passion, spending practically every day in the summer on the water in Oyster Bay, Long Island. We looked for every opportunity to race, and we did well. By 1974, Dad ran the Junior Sailing program at the yacht club and was very proud to see that both his sons had won their respective classes in Blue Jays that summer. Unfortunately, I went on to become extremely competitive and did not want to race with Dad anymore. Dad was more interested in simply having fun and being out on the water. To me, it was all about racing and winning. In my later teen age years, I exclusively raced with others and continued to do well. Dad never said a word about it. No matter what, he was always caring and positive.

I gave up sailing for almost 20 years to go to college, work, and raise a family of my own. I dove back into sailing with a reinvigorated passion seven years ago, and the results have been great. This time, I 've made a point to not only try hard and do well, but ensure that everyone on the crew has fun and is made to feel part of the team. My biggest yearinng remains to take Dad out with us and have him experience some serious fun. I've lost that opportunity as Dad passed away several years ago. There's not a day that does not go by where I don't thank him and wish for a one time opportunity to take him sailing. Though that won't happen, he has instilled in me a strong sense of gratefulness that goes hand in hand with accomplishment, and I will lover him forever for that. It's a shame we have to grow older before we even begin to get smart.

Jim M.


windA07
*

Jun 1, 2007, 12:33 AM

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My first sailing experience was probably while I was still in my mother’s stomach, and I have been sailing ever since then. Both sides of my family are sailing based, and I have much to be proud of. My first memories of sailing with my father were aboard Jeff Eberly’s Peterson 38, Cilista, cruising in Maine many summers back. I have spent most of my summers since then cruising with my father aboard various boats. My father has owned a Dyer Dow since he was a kid, and he introduced me to small boat sailing in that very boat. He enrolled me in the Manchester Sailing Association for a few summers, where I progressed from Dyers, to Optimists, to Lasers, and then to 420s. Many times, my father would take my sister and I out cruising in Penobscot Bay to Narraganset Bay, and everywhere in between. Being that he is a very active member of the CCA, he and I have done many cruises together. In 1999, we sailed from St. Anthony to St. John’s, Newfoundland with the fleet. Another notable cruise was the Boatbuilders Cruise in 2001. We traveled around Penobscot Bay to various yards in the area aboard an S&S 41, Seguin. My father first introduced me to racing aboard Cilista and Joe Harris’ Aerodyne 38, Gryphon, sailing in various Wednesday night racing series races off Marblehead, MA. We then raced aboard Richard Casner’s IMX 40 in the 2005 NYYC Annual Regatta and the 2006 NYYC race week. My father first introduced me to offshore racing in 2005, with the centennial Halifax Race aboard Jim Muldoon’s Donnybrook, a custom Santa Cruz 73. Later that summer, we headed to England for the Fastnet Race aboard Hal Denton’s Trintella 50, Valour. This past summer was the first time that my father and I sailed in an offshore race aboard different boats. This was my first Bermuda Race, his 17th or so. I sailed in style in the Cruiser Division aboard Valour, while he roughed it out aboard the Kiwi boat Maximus. When I arrived in Bermuda, about 2 days after him, my father was so proud of me. Seeing him so happy will stay with me forever. Since then, I have become much more independent in my racing. This summer I will be racing my second Halifax on Donnybrook without him, as he will be cruising in Norway aboard the Apogee 50, Joyant. Back in 2002 when my father took the position of chairman of the Bermuda Race, I got a real taste of how complex the sailing world really is. Ever since then whenever my father and I are talking, I always ask him about what’s going on in the world of sailing; new rules, new boats, recent surveys he has done, etc. I truly believe that without my father, I would not have acquired the burning passion for sailing that I have today. I plan on racing in the Bermuda Race, as well as many other races and regattas, until I catch up with him; if I catch up with him Smile. I have nominated him many times for Seahorse’s sailor of the month, and I will continue to do so until he receives the spot. One of my goals for the future (he doesn’t know about this yet) is to sail around the world with him. Sailing, among other things, is the main thing that brings my father and I together. I hope to one day follow in his footsteps and become the respected sailor that he is. I’m not sure where I would be without him, but in the mean time I plan on continuing to share my passion with him for as long as I can.

Alden Winder, 18
To my father, John Winder


sails4fun
**


Jun 1, 2007, 11:30 AM

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Mom told me that our first sail together was when I was six weeks old, Dad. You never were afraid to share the wonders of sail with me. Putting me in that crazy dingy on the lake might have appeared risky - but you never waivered!
You always encouraged me to let sailing take me to places I might never go, before learning to love it.
Our 10 day sail to Mexico aboard "Entourage" together became one of the most memorable trips of my life. You towed us to the start of Transpac and waived goodby as we took off across the Pacific.
Thanks for the introduction to this wonderful sport, for sticking with it through the many boat partners and crummy crews. Thanks for letting me on one the secret of sharing the wind with good friends.


Karin King
*

Jun 1, 2007, 4:14 PM

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Dear Dad and all those other male skippers (mostly fathers and grandfathers too),
How does a little girl who learned to sail a Sunfish with her Dad at the Jersey shore and various lakes in southeastern PA in the early 70s end up with a 3 page resume of 20 years of sailing experience? From Wednesday night beer can racing off City Island in the Bronx to every weekend racing in San Francisco Bay, and ocean racing, deliveries, and cruising in the Atlantic, North Pacific, South Pacific, and the Caribbean on boats ranging from a Wylie Wabbit to a Santa Cruz 50. Dad, thank you for laying the foundation and continuing to provide the encouragement for me to explore this world of endless opportunities, new friends, and faraway places. And thank you to all of those other male skippers, mostly fathers and grandfathers too, you know who you are, who took me on as crew aboard C&Cs 32 and 48, a Beneteau 42, a Peterson 44, Express 27s & 37s, an Olson 30, Melges 24s, a Mumm 30, a Farr 40, and a Santa Cruz 50. You have taken me to regattas like the SF Big Boat Series, Key West, SORC, Antigua Race Week and on ocean races galore, down and up the coast to Catalina Island, Santa Barbara, and Drakes Bay. You have taken me to explore uninhabited islands off Costa Rica and the breaching humpback whales off Tonga and to transit the Panama Canal. You have put those sometimes intimidating male crew in their place and asked me to continue trimming the kite under the Golden Gate as the speed climbed to 22 knots or asked me to take the tiller so you could play the ukulele with fellow crew while drifting off Point Conception in a race to Santa Barbara. You have given me the opportunity to sail with some of the best like Olympic Gold medalist, Mark Reynolds, for a week at Key West. You have given me your complete trust and confidence while turning over the watch and helm on ocean races, cruising, and crossings from Hawaii and deliveries to weather, up both US coasts. You have complimented me on my seamanship and leadership during the scariest moment of them all with a broken steering chain, forty-five knot winds, eighteen foot seas, and still several hundred miles from home and the Farallones Islands on a delivery from Hawaii. You have pushed me into boat ownership and skippering my own Wylie Wabbit in this predominantly male sport and small local SF Bay racing fleet. Most of all you have shown me what real teamwork, concentration, and motivation can accomplish on the race course and Monday to Friday in my other predominantly male world of engineering. The cruising has taught me what little space and stuff I need to be truly happy. I have sailed with many talented and wonderful women as well and I am not without female sailor role models like Ellen Macarthur and Dawn Riley, but let’s face it this sport is still predominantly male. After meeting my husband in the Oakland YC after a Wednesday night beer can race ten years ago, I now have two young boys (11 months and 4 years) who I look forward to sharing this truly unique experience of sailing. And thank you Dad for memorializing one of my proudest moments in a Jim Dewitt painting that hangs on my living room wall. My oldest son often asks, “Is that you Mom driving that boat on the wall?” Yes, Zach, that is me with trapeze crew, Don, steering my Wylie Wabbit in a race on San Francisco Bay. Sailing for me has not been about the wins and losses but the good friends I’ve met along the way and… “the faraway places and the ever changing light, the silence, and a great peace at the bottom of your soul.” Ference Mate
Thank you Dad and the rest of you who have given me one of the greatest gifts I look forward to sharing this love with my boys.
Karin King, Age 42
Full time working Mom, wife, and sailor forever
Alameda, CA


Frederic
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Jun 6, 2007, 2:55 AM

Post #19 of 28 (86508 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Dad, building a 30' sailboat out of epoxy, glass and mahogony in the middle of Africa when I was in mom’s tummy has made you a legacy in my mind. You were determined not to just sail in the far reaches of our planet, but to do so you designed and built your own boats. You had no background or experience, only shear determination, that’s admirable. Having had to abandon “Sylvia” in Katana, you built another one when we started over in Fairbanks, Alaska, that's balls! (How could I resist balancing the boat to get the icicles hanging off the rails in the water but not capsizing in September on Cleary Lake?)

Did I learn the secret to designing a fast sailboat? Of course! You told me the fastest boats leave the smallest wake. So design a boat with a small wake – simple! I haven’t designed any boats, but that El Toro I built out of one eighth inch thick plywood using your methods still wins Friday nighters some 13 years later.

What I really appreciate is that you brought the world of sailing into my life. I’ve been fortunate to sail across oceans, meet sailors around the world and find myself welcome on just about any sailboat thanks to the passion for sailing you instilled in me.

Hey Dad, I have to go, Luca and Ondine are on the bulkhead waiting to take the Melges out. I have to let them steer this time.


Nancy Hood
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Jun 6, 2007, 9:12 AM

Post #20 of 28 (86466 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Dear Dad,
Where would I be today if I didn't have the sailing knowledge that you instilled in me from the time I was tiny? Everything my life has lead to has been because of sailing and I owe that to you. The "kiddie cruises" through Martha's Vineyard; the sailing classes; learning how to row on a long tether tied up behind the boat; all the racing from Sunfish to Etchells to big boats. You taught me so much and took me to so many regattas where a (young) girl may not have necessarily been thought of as having the knowledge or the ability, and you stood up for me when people doubted that I could actually do the job. I hope I never let you down.

Sure, I've made some mistakes on the boat along the way, especially when I put the kite up sideways and the yacht designer was onboard, but you always encouraged me to keep going.

In the past 16 years I have raced in world class events all over the world in all size boats. And I am probably one of the few 47 year old moms doing the bow on a Swan 68 in these events. I have seen so many places, experienced some amazing times, and met so many wonderful people. I owe that to you. What would I do without sailing? What would I do without you?

I share the gift of sailing with my 20 year-old son now as he and i do bow together on the Swan. It is truly a great feeling.

Even today, as I leave for another big regatta, you say to me "one hand for the boat". I don't think you know how often I think of that as I'm getting pummeled by waves on the bow of the Swan. You are always there with me.

Dad, you're the best. Thank you. I love you.
-NH


dbs01
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Jun 6, 2007, 10:15 AM

Post #21 of 28 (86457 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I started sailing fairly late in life, relative to everyone else I'm now racing with. But my parents instilled in me a love of the water from a very early age - Dad took us to San Diego every year for vacation. Those vacations always included a harbor cruise and plenty of time around the water! When I finally did start sailing, and immediately started racing, Dad always came out when there was a viewing opportunity (but Dad, did you have to let Mom bring a sign???).

And for that first Christmas after I started racing, Dad got me the bag 'o boats from US Sailing. I've never used them in a protest room, but they're much better than cocktail napkins when you need to make a point!!!!





douglasic633
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Jun 6, 2007, 6:36 PM

Post #22 of 28 (86409 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Dad,

As I recall, I was 7 yrs. old when one summer evening, you held our dinghy alongside the dock so I could get into the boat (before you). Then before I knew what was going on, you pushed the boat away from the dock and told me to sail back to you. Well, here it is 39 yrs. later and I still have not sailed back to the dock. Thank you, dad, for giving me the gift of sailing and a passion for the open water.

love,

doug Cool


WillSka
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Jun 7, 2007, 8:44 PM

Post #23 of 28 (86213 views)
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My name is Charlie and I'm 7. My dad took me sailing for the first time this week and I'm so excited. He's in the Navy and I don't see him much, but he is teaching me to sail. I think he likes to race, but I don't think he's very good at it. I'm going to beat him when I'm a little older. Im going back there [Newport, RI] to visit him and we are going sailing again. I'm going to take lessons, but I want my dad to teach me first.

(This is Dad typing and the boy has some gumption.)


The Publisher
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Jun 8, 2007, 12:55 PM

Post #24 of 28 (86159 views)
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Re: [annienelson] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

All the notes posted prior to 12pm PT on June 8th were eligible for a random drawing to win the Atlantis WeatherGear Grand Prix Softshell Vest, and this post is the WINNER!






In Reply To
Dear Dad,
Yesterday I went to a funeral for a good friend's Dad. He read a letter to his dad telling all the things he remembered about him that he loved and admired. As I listened and felt his pain, I knew you are lying in a hospital bed and I wonder of this time you will be OK. I told myslef I will write you a letter now, while you are alive, telling you hpw much I love you. I have always thanked you for giving me the gift of the love of the ocean, but I can never say it enough. Sort of like hearing someone say "I love you". You can never say it or hear it enough. So dad, today I will write you a long letter, but I share on this sailing forum with others how much I love you. Giving me a little pram and guiding me off the dock, then a Sunfish and letting me go play in the bay with friends or by myself, not pushing me to race because I hated it and wasn't very good anyway, and then after begging you to buy me a Hobie 16 you helping me get a loan to buy it myself. You knew that would make me love it that much more. Begging you to let me borrow your yacht so I could race with all my girlfriends and sisters and you coming along to make sure we didn't hurt it or ourselves. And I'll never forget meeting you for lunch after graduating from university and showing you my plan for racing in the SORC with my all female crew. You knew how much I loved the game you had shared with me but did you know I would run with it? I'm sorry I didn't use my degree that you paid for, but I know you are proud because while you had your health you came to every event that I entered, cheering from the dock, a tray with pina colodas or a bucket of champagne or a hug and a kiss to show how much you cared.
I miss those days dad, and whenver I race a big event, I think of you standing on the dock letting me sail.
How lucky can a girl be? You gave me life, courage, independence, and a love of nature that has guided me throughout my life. I am so lucky!
Thanks dad.
I love you,
annie






The Publisher
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Jun 8, 2007, 1:04 PM

Post #25 of 28 (86154 views)
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Even though the drawing has occurred, Scuttlebutt hopes that the 'buttheads will continue to submit their Father's Day post. Mine is coming next week.

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt


Gayle
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Jun 8, 2007, 8:30 PM

Post #26 of 28 (86131 views)
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Happy Father’s Day, Pop!
So much to thank you for dearest father of mine! First off I thank you for my name. Although you initially believed “Hurricane” Marriner would be the perfect name for your first born, I’m glad you finally opted for “Gayle” Marriner or “Sailor of the Winds.” The name has been a good name, Pop, and I still wear it with pride.
Next I thank you for my exciting childhood filled with sailing, regatta circuits, parties, and an extended family comprised of a vast clique of top-notch sailors from all walks of life. From our one-design boats - Stars, Thistles, Lightenings, Comets, Penguins, Sunfish - with names like “Party-Party” and “Soiree” to the wonderfully adventuresome MORC and SORC - the stories are endless and cherished.
I also thank you for teaching me to sail. And for saving me from drowning three times - the first when you threw me off the dock in an attempt to teach me to swim; the second when you were supposed to be watching me at the yacht club beach but got distracted in the re-telling of the day’s races; and the third occurring the first time I crewed for you and got washed overboard by a big wave - Although some may say you were also the cause of those near-drownings, you were always a savior in my eyes.
And thank you and Muz for hanging the painting of Mary Patten, sailing ‘round the Horn in her scarlet Victorian garb, over my bed. What great inspiration for a young girl to dream on.
My life on and near the water continues to be a joy. Thank you for giving me the training, the tools and the maritime knowledge to be fearless yet respectful of the sea. As Ratty in Wind in the Willows said “There is nothing—absolutely nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.”
With Much Love and Gratitude…
Attachments: Pop's Father's Day letter for scuttlebutt.doc (26.0 KB)


The Publisher
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Jun 18, 2007, 7:18 AM

Post #27 of 28 (85413 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I don't thank my dad enough, don't appreciate what he has done for me enough, don't check in with him enough. We had some rough times early on, but those are long ago. Parenting isn't easy - I know that now. I feel lucky that I can still talk with him, and I am sure to miss him if that were to change. Thanks for all your support and encouragement ... I love you. - Craig


The Publisher
*****


Jun 18, 2007, 7:19 AM

Post #28 of 28 (85412 views)
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Re: [The Publisher] Father's Day 2007 - Atlantis WeatherGear [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Being Dad May Be Tougher These Days, but Working Moms are among Their Biggest Fans

by Kim Parker, Senior Researcher, Pew Research Center for the People & the Press

Interesting full story:
http://pewresearch.org/pubs/510/fathers-day


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