Scuttlebutt Website SCUTTLEBUTT
SAILING NEWS
ForumIndex CLASSIFIED ADS Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG IN         

Forum Index: .: Dock Talk:
The Soccerization of Sailing
Team McLube

 

 


The Publisher
*****


Mar 19, 2009, 11:25 AM

Post #1 of 20 (22813 views)
Shortcut
The Soccerization of Sailing Log-In to Post/Reply

The opportunities amid youth sailing are increasing. Different boats, traveling to regattas, expert coaching... plenty to absorb, and all specifically focussed on youth sailors. However, while it is great how youth sailors have options that will excite them, let’s not forget that these options are temporary, and vanish as the sailor grows up. If youth sailors are to become life sailors, connecting the youth sailor to options that will be available to them beyond their school years should be a priority too.


- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt




The Publisher
*****


Mar 19, 2009, 11:27 AM

Post #2 of 20 (22808 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Posted in Scuttlebutt 2804:

* From Rick Hatch, US Sailing Umpire:

I encounter far too many youth racing programs that seem to be singularly focused on fleet racing and development of future Olympic team members. That approach results in a very skinny, tall pyramid of sailing talent - with a steep, long learning slope and a big distance between the few near the peak and the majority closer to its base. Too many young sailors on this pyramid end up slipping off the slope.

Instead, I strongly believe that one of the best possible ways to connect the youth sailor to more engaging options later in life than all but the most competitive one-design fleet racing is to foster active team racing in youth programs, where the more talented team members can raise the game of their weaker team-mates. Run the youth team racing program in one-design dinghies with simple sail plans like the CFJ, Club 420 (trapeze rigs not recommended) or Vanguard 15.

Then, as sailors seek a bit more comfort, run team racing programs for adults in easy to equalize, member-owned, club-owned or sailing association-managed one design keelboats like the J/22, Sonar, even mini-12 metres - any class of keelboat that isn't too fragile and can be crewed by no more than four people - as long as the level of sailing skill required to sail the boat enables the focus to be on tactics, not raw boat speed or an Olympic gymnastics-level of crew work.





The Publisher
*****


Mar 19, 2009, 11:29 AM

Post #3 of 20 (22807 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Posted in Scuttlebutt 2805:

* From Paul Tara:

The Curmudgeon comment regarding youth boats as temporary options, and the need to connect youth sailors to more long term sailing solutions, were very astute. (It's always later than you think, but you can't expect all these young whippersnappers to realize it.) I also agree with Rick Hatch's analogy in 'Butt 2804 of the "very skinny, tall pyramid of sailing talent" - steep sided, and very, very slippery. A structure, unfortunately, that has been fostered by U.S. Sailing, with its top down support of a few anointed classes, creation of a "National Team", and thirst for Olympic medals.

If the present picture of youth sailing in the United States is so rosy, why:
1. Is sailing's popularity declining in the U.S.?
2. Is there an increasing disregard for the rules, especially at the Scholastic level?
3. Is the art of seamanship so low among young sailors?

If we're turning out all these great young sailors, where's the disconnect? Perhaps we should focus less on winning medals, and more on the values we are imparting? I submit that it does no good to have a kid finish 70th out of 400, when two years later he's off surfing.


The Publisher
*****


Mar 19, 2009, 11:56 AM

Post #4 of 20 (22804 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I am not convinced that the structure of youth sailing in the U.S. is much different than the other sporting options available (baseball, soccer, etc.). In fact, I am beginning to wonder if that might be the problem. In active sailing areas, youth sailing has become highly refined with boats, events, and coaching. Things are scheduled, kids show up when told to, enjoy the time together, and then disperse. I am officially coining the term, the “Soccerization of sailing."

The attrition we see in sailing among younger people is not unlike the attrition seen in other sports. This spring there were a new crop of 5 and 6 year olds that signed up to play baseball. However, as this group ages, attrition will begin. By the time they are 13 years old, easily half will have quit. If they hang in there and succeed in getting on their freshman high school baseball team, there is no lock that they will make it to their senior year. Sitting on the bench gets as old as doing poorly in sailboat races.

Other sports have youth leagues and adult leagues, and sailing has been pulled into this thinking at the youth level. However, unlike other sports, sailing does not use the same "type of ball" at the adult level as it does at the youth level. The sooner a kid gets introduced to the type of balls used beyond youth sailing, the better the chance they might transition into sailing's adult league.

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt




SWOOSH
**


Mar 19, 2009, 10:24 PM

Post #5 of 20 (22768 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I am 41, have sailed most of my life but never participated in junior sailing. In fact I did not begin racing until I was into my thirties. However, in my thirties I was been fortunate to sail in numerous grand prix level events form Farr 40's to TP52s. I was lucky to have learned top down, big boats first, with numerous pros to learn from. I now own a J105 and am continually building a crew and managing weights. There are times when I have and would again take juniors out racing but the reality of junior sailing is that even the best juniors are mostly only trained to helm, trim main, or call tactics, because for some that is all they have ever done. I would never suggest eliminating dingy sailing for juniors as I would have benefitted greatly from it. However I wonder how we bridge the training at the junior level to incorporate keel boat, position specific, skills and team based seamanship skills. With one design weight limits so important the door is wide open for juniors to fill roles. I just wish there was a better progression in our sport that taught the skills young people need to sail more than just small boats.


robertwilkes
*

Mar 20, 2009, 3:55 AM

Post #6 of 20 (22749 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Ref Curmudgeon's comment that "However, unlike other sports, sailing
does not use the same “type of ball” at the adult level as it does at the
youth level. The sooner a kid gets introduced to the type of balls used beyond
youth sailing, the better the chance they might transition into sailing's
adult league.
" may I as an ignorant European enquire why I find junior (10-15) baseball bats widely advertised on the internet? Maybe sailing is like the shot-putt: you don't get to use adult equipment until you are physically ready for it.

There is plenty of evidence that staying in a youth class (until you get too heavy for it) increases the chance of transition to the adult league. 46% of 2008 Olympians had stayed in the Optimist at least long enough to reach world or continental team level. At a broader level the study www.optiworld.org/dropoutreport.pdf showed that around 80% of sailors at Optimist national championships were still sailing five years later even though only 15% of them were even trying to get to the Olympics. Finishing 70th out of 400 at 13 does NOT seem to cause dropout. Ref an earlier post advocating team-racing note that most of the USA/Harvard team which recently won the Team Racing Worlds were ex-Optimist internationals.

Kids try many sports and it is understandable that they tend to stick with the ones they are good at. If you don't like finishing 70th out of 400 at 13 I doubt if you will like it any better at 19.

Ref the decline in sailing has anyone looked hard at the evidence? Cetainly in Europe the charter holiday indistry has been booming and I just wonder if the children of those who sailed wooden boats round Lake Michigan are not now sunning themselves in the Grenadines, unrecorded by USSailing, their clubs or people who want to sell them their own boats.





PeterStrong
*

Mar 20, 2009, 5:24 AM

Post #7 of 20 (22739 views)
Shortcut
Re: [robertwilkes] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Making sure the kids that start racing sailboats enjoy it is the key. Stating the obvious maybe. I have been the Director and Optimist coach at the US Sailing Center of Martin County for the past three years. Where we are located, Jensen Beach, FL, there are little or no opportunities for the kids to sail anything besides small boats so in order to make sure they want to keep sailing after high school we have to make sure that they have fun regardless of their results. We have kids from the back of the pack to the Optimist US National team sailing here all together. For some of them the results are part of what keeps them on the water but for all of them it is the friendships they create and the love of messing around in boats that ties them to the sport for the rest of their lives. Learning to do foredeck at 13 isn't keeping these kids sailing the rest of their lives. Making them good sailors that can learn to do foredeck and enjoy being on any boat when given the opportunity is what does it. Do you want to train a non-sailor to crew on your keel boat or might it be a bit easier to train someone that knows where the sail is going to go when you tack. Like all sports we need to plug as many kids in at the bottom level, Opti Green Fleet here, whatever the boat is where you are. Also make sure programs are providing easy avenues to entry for older kids that may be behind curve in race training, High School sailing for example or Keel boat programs where available. Opportunities for sailing on boats you will sail later in life are definitely a great thing to provide, but if they don't enjoy it it won't matter.


Blitzen
**

Mar 20, 2009, 8:46 AM

Post #8 of 20 (22708 views)
Shortcut
Re: [PeterStrong] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Since when does "Youth Sailing" have to always mean racing? Why don't we expand the definition to include cruising & daysailing - "just messing about in boats"? My 2 boys both did the Opti program at our club and enjoyed it except for having to deal with the kids whose parents constantly pushed them to the point where they either hated the sport or developed this "win at all costs" attitude. Remember that other thread on this site about a Laser event that was tainted by a participant's lack of sportsmanship?

When he was 9, my youngest said the following the night before what was to be his last youth event - "Dad, I'm really tired of all the stuff that goes on at the races - can't we just take your boat out tomorrow and sail?

Again, that was his last youth event and we've been sailing together ever since (8 yrs.). We also go fishing on small center console power boat. We have fun. Both boys love the water and they love to sail. That will last for a lifetime. They're still competitive, one plays golf and tennis and the other plays tennis and is a competitive skeet and trap shooter. Both will likely join our sailing club one day - they may race that may not. They'll still be supporting our sport economically, on the race committee, etc. Isn't that what this is all about?


RovingJohn
**

Mar 20, 2009, 8:54 AM

Post #9 of 20 (22704 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I started sailing at age 11 , by the tried and true method of being pushed off the dock with a half hours 'chalk talk' to prepare. The result was three capsizes and rightings, a very wet and cold kid, and the absolute desire to never leave the water again. For some years, I was quite happy just jumping inot the little boat after school to explore, and learn by doing. Racing only came along later, as a result of peer activity, and, yes, became the 'only' way to go for a few years. One can become quite good at anything that gets persistent effort.
What got lost along the way, was that pure pleasure of exploring and merely enjoying the oceans and varied activities. As the years went by, and my youthful spirits and agility waned, I found myself once again headed back to the basics that hooked me in the first place. Sailing is again an activity for me, not just a sport, and I have again found the pure pleasure of just being on the water, following the breeze, and exploring. Sure, I still race on occasion, but that is a small part of the full measure I get from the avocation.
I would submit that a part of the problem today may be that we have organized the individual pleasure out of sailing by focusing far too much on racing and high level competition. There are multitudes of kids out there who are less interested in winning a race than simply sailing for the pure pleasure of it. Sailing skills and seamanship should be taught as talents that can be applied to a wide range of enjoyable activities. Matching those activities to the variety of kids interests might go along way to building enduring interest and involvement in sailing.


RMJepsen
**

Mar 20, 2009, 9:42 AM

Post #10 of 20 (22688 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Getting youth sailors and would be sailors to play with the same 'balls' as adults is a real key to keeping youth in sailing.
Teens, in particular, require, on average, a different experience of sailing than what can be found in club 420s, or even 29rs.

Offering an experience that includes the following: more complexity and power, a platform that promotes team work and socializing with other teens (especially opposite sex) while sailing, attracts would be teen-sailors to the sport and keeps teens who are small boat sailors excited about progressing to a platform more suited to their needs and desires at that age.

There are many successes out there in the country, from Team Tsunami in Annapolis to Ida Lewis YC in Newport to Black Rock YC in Connecticut who offer Junior Big Boat Sailing experiences for basic sailing and for racing on larger boats from 25-40 feet. It does involve commitment from a program and some generous boat owners giving of their own time and the use of their boat, but it has shown a remarkable ability to re-engage teens in sailing, when they are confronted with so many attractive alternatives.

US SAILING continues to work on and develop informational and educational tools to make the process easier for community programs and yacht clubs to provide the support needed to get teens out on big boats in groups so they view sailing as a way to connect with others their own age and get to play on a machine that is normally unavailable to them.

So, while US SAILING does work hard at its obligation to promote excellence at the Olympic Sailing level, it also works hard to foster and promote participation and the joy of sailing to all levels, junior, teen and adult in many "non-elite" ways that receive much less publicity.

Rich Jepsen
Chair, Education Division
US SAILING


Tcatman
**

Mar 20, 2009, 10:48 AM

Post #11 of 20 (22671 views)
Shortcut
Re: [RMJepsen] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

The sooner a kid gets introduced to the type of balls used beyond youth sailing, the better the chance they might transition into sailing's adult league.



Your underlying assumption is that you must limit the problem and focus on developing lifetime competitive sailing. I agree and offer some solutions.

I think the solution is to compliment the competitive pipeline approach of junior sailing (the soccerization that you speak of). The current sport jargon is termed “Cross Training” The idea is to move the juniors out of laser radials and 420’s and give them a brief exposure to an adult racing class within their sailing program. The goal is to teach them a mode of sailboat racing (Apparent wind sailing or control of sail shape etc etc) . This would allow them to experience a different flavor of competitive sailing and become aware of different adult race boats. The sailing coaches who run the junior programs are required to actively support this kind of program within the context of their junior sailing program… Without their leadership… the kids won’t participate. We have many years of experience that just putting a kid on their parents Lightning or as crew on a Hobie 16 at an adult regatta does not produce a great long term outcome. Likewise, crew on Dad’s keel boat in a race does not make a life long racer. What’s needed is partnership between a local adult class and a junior program that lends the adult boat to a qualified junior sailor for a two day racing clinic! (will let you know if it works out)


Targeted programs are a promising new approach. On the Chesapeake Bay, The Team Tsunami program runs a two boat J109 program for junior sailors who train and compete in the CBYRA races with an adult safety officer on the boat. The experience of crewing on an all youth boat and not on their parents boat is quite different and far more empowering to a junior sailor. Moreover, many studies note that junior sailors REQUIRE the peer social structure to stay interested in anything! Putting one kid on seven race boats will never be as successful.

Catamaran sailors have no junior training pipeline at any yacht clubs in the USA. Hobie 16 sailing families have their kids as crew but very few juniors move on to competing at adult events on their own. The CISA program in California has focused on elite junior sailors and discovered that attracting top 420 sailors to cross train on catamarans with a goal of competing in ISAF championships is another mechanism to get junior sailors racing adult boats.

These three initiatives are promising but don’t address the fundamental problem! The basic structure of our racing program works against developing lifetime competitive sailors. We split the major junior regattas to Monday through Friday and have our adult dinghy and Keel boat regattas on Saturday and Sunday. The junior sailors have no real exposure to the adult classes on the beach. It forces families to manage their weekend time into family activities and personal sailing activity. Consider a program where the big junior regatta of the week was held in conjunction with an adult dinghy regatta… the entire family would be on the water…(or give mom a day to herself!) each sailing in the toy of their choice. Some juniors would naturally try to move up and sail against their parents and the old farts in the fleet. The after sailing social would keep the family together at the club and naturally build a community that has all ages on the beach.
Tcatman


Ben Capuco
*

Mar 21, 2009, 12:10 PM

Post #12 of 20 (22544 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Blitzen] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

   
I can speak for the experience I've had with my kids, they were entered into each of the big club programs here in Annapolis and just never got excited about racing. The problem is, the programs all pushed them to get into an Opti alone ... great for advancing a racing sailor rapidly, but awful for a kid that hasn't caught the racing bug. In the end they were turned off, they simply didn't want to be out sailing alone.

My fondest memories of junior sailing weren't the races we won but the time I spent with my friends on the boat. Reaching out to the race course and sailing around between races ... joking and telling stories - those are the things that made me love the sport even when I wasn't on the top of the leader board. Those are the same things that make most of us stay in it as adults as well.

You could probably turn out some great quarterbacks by starting them on programs that eliminated the team and social aspects of the sport and emphasized the pure mechanics of throwing the ball. By high school you would have eliminated all the kids that weren't quarterback material and you would have a tough time fielding a team. That may not be a perfect analogy, but it's something to think about.


The Publisher
*****


Mar 22, 2009, 9:35 AM

Post #13 of 20 (22482 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Paul Kueffner Southport CT:

When my children were of the age of Optimists, I considered building them one. It would have been a fun project to work on together, would have been relatively inexpensive, and could have served to provide a galvanizing winter activity at our club for us and other families. The USODA advised me at the time that no "home-built" boat would be allowed to measure in for the class association, and that no plans were available for sale. An authorized builder's boat would have to be purchased in order to race in any USODA authorized events. I was dumbfounded and disgusted. Now, about 20 years later, you report a program to build Optis from kits at $1650 a pop. It is nice to hear that other people agree that building an Opti is a feasible and fun goal. I hope the boats measure in, and that Clark Mills isn't rolling over in his grave at the exorbitant cost for what he designed to be an inexpensive, easy-to-home-build, simple 2-sheet plywood box.


The Publisher
*****


Mar 22, 2009, 11:10 AM

Post #14 of 20 (22474 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Gregory Scott:

Your point is well heard.... I didn't start sailing until I was in my twenties .... Before that I played tennis ... When I was kid, my summer day began getting myself going - fed and on my bike to head off to the tennis club FOR THE DAY ... Sometime late in the day I found my way home... While at the club, we played tennis - got coached - played cards - played ping pong - played tennis - got coached and mentored by adult members , on life skills and etiquette. My brother sailed and says the same was true at the sailing club. As i became more involved in sailing and became a fixture at a sailing club, I found kids hangin out all day, and at the end of the day hitching a ride on an adult boat for the evening races.

This past summer I began seriously playing tennis again for the first time in years ... Other than kids at the morning summer camp, there were no kids !!! I asked why, well because they're off at numerous other "organized" aspects of their day... As parents we have taken the independent fun out of so many kid summers. Organized soccer, at scheduled field times will hold NA back from ever leading that sport... Kids shooting hoops in the driveway keeps the USA at the top of basketball as much as the NCAA does. Just as kids kicking a ball on a dusty field has the same effect in Brazil or Italy...




The Publisher
*****


Mar 22, 2009, 11:34 AM

Post #15 of 20 (22470 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Roy Williams:

I would like to respond to Paul Tara's statement: "If the present picture of youth sailing in the United States is so rosy, why: Is there an increasing disregard for the rules, especially at the Scholastic level?"

If by "Scholastic level" he is referring to High School sailing under the auspices of ISSA then I believe that he is wrong to paint all of high school sailing with the same brush. Obviously I can't comment on what happens in the ISSA district that he observes but as someone who has coached a high school team every season for the last twenty five years and has attended ISSA regattas all over the country in almost every one of those years, I believe the opposite to be true. Over the years the standard of sailing has improved incredibly and, certainly as far as the top teams that attend national events is concerned, rules violations have decreased considerably. In fact many of my sailors who sail during the summers are astonished by some of the rules violations that they see adults making!




AJM
*

Mar 22, 2009, 7:03 PM

Post #16 of 20 (22442 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I always find these jr sailing discussions interesting. The use of the term "soccerization" is used in this context, I think, disapprovingly. Soccer is of course bar none the most successful sport in the world. Success in soccer often comes as a result of hard work and dedicated coaching, and what could be wrong with this result? Sailing on this continent would hope to dream to be as successful as soccer. On actual jr sailing has anyone looked at participation in opti regattas lately. US nationals and other regional regattas such as the New Englands have had participation in the 400 + boat range. Behind this are thousands more kids racing boats that never make it to the big regattas. At opti regatta after opti regatta the organizer will announce the latest participation as the largest single class one design regatta in US history as the numbers march steadily to the 500 + boat regatta. I say to those chicken little's out there this - I junior sailed in the early to mid seventies, 50 to 60 boats then is as big as I remember in the bluejay or other such fleet. Look at this years Orange Bowl held in Miami after Christmas. Hundreds upon hundreds of boats with I think 24 countries attending. I don't think we should second guess the optimist world wide movement. The world wide optimist olympic results improve every four years continuously such that 85 % or more of the medalists are now former optimist sailors. Rather than send our children back to sailing thinly attended relic classes of the past or make them sail on large boring keelboats as crew for a dad or an uncle lets encourage the grassroots of optimist sailing at our sailing clubs. We should come to know that 95% of kids who learn to sail in a boat other than an optimist and who do not actively race before the age of 13 will quit the sport by the age of 15. We should know that 50 % or more kids who learn to race in opti's continue on in the sport. Lets hope we can soccerize sailing


The Publisher
*****


Mar 23, 2009, 6:41 AM

Post #17 of 20 (22412 views)
Shortcut
Re: [AJM] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

When I said "soccerization", it was not to be disapproving, but it was to compare the two sports. Young kids play rec soccer, and if they are good, they advance to club soccer. If they are not good, they tend to drop out by their teen years. Club teams travel to tournaments rather than play at their local field. Most club players will compete in high school, with a small percentage continuing to play in college. However, after the school years, it is then an even smaller percentage that continue playing as an adult. When I looked at the numbers of kids that begin soccer, and the number of young adults that are still playing, I saw the comparison between soccer and sailing.

Numbers don't lie... Optimist events get huge numbers. However, what is the percentage of young sailors that continue sailing after their school years? There are a lot of young sailors that grow up in lakes where large yacht club programs and high school sailing teams are not available. If these kids sail, it is on the boats that are being sailed in the area. I don't know if these kids are more likely to continue sailing than if they had learned in an Opti program on the coast, but at least they were exposed to the post-school opportunities at an earlier age.

I should add that my two boys (now 12 and 14) tried sailing, but ultimately chose other sports. I know that it would have helped if their classmates were into sailing, but none were. And yes, these sports will disappear for them after their school years. Will they return to sailing then? Time will tell.

Comments?




The Publisher
*****


Mar 24, 2009, 2:59 PM

Post #18 of 20 (22279 views)
Shortcut
Re: [RMJepsen] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Posted in Scuttlebutt 2808:

From Dawn Riley:

What a great letter by Rich Jepsen from OCSC (in SBUTT 2807) I agree, we have to encourage teens who naturally and desperately want to be adults to take some leadership and have some responsibility and what better way to do that then to have them in charge of their own borrowed keelboat and with others of their own age (yes coed is preferable). Nothing against my parents but I became obsessed with sailboat racing at age 13, the day that I went racing on a big boat without them. That continued through Sea Scouts where someone had donated an awful colored Dufor 29 to us, so we named it Agent Orange and went practicing or racing five days a week. Oh - and my obsession still continues.




Pat Sikorski
*

Mar 25, 2009, 7:57 AM

Post #19 of 20 (22052 views)
Shortcut
Re: [The Publisher] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

Tue 3/24/2009 4:04 PM For what's it worth, the Scuttlebutt editor has a sympathetic ear for non-commercial programs that connect young sailors to boats other than the current fare of youth-specific options. - Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt Editor Craig Leweck We at 12mYDF [12m Yacht Development Foundation ] stand in full agreement with Dawn Riey's and Rich Jepsen's comments in recent Scuttlebutt article on encouraging youth sailing and from what we have heard around the yacht clubs and sailing organization of Long Island Sound. In fact we are planning to aggressively approach the issues by offering what we consider to be "a different experience of sailing than what can be found in club 420s, or even 29rs."

As you may have heard from one of our Trustees and Sailing Advisory Committee Secretary Bill Sandberg, our 12m Yacht Development Foundation recently launched the Gary Jobson 12m Sail Camps & Clinics -see attached- to the 41 yacht clubs, Commodores, sailing directors sailing instructors of of Long Island Sound -which was very well received- in February at the recent JSA -Junior Sailing Association Winter Meeting - at Beach Point YC in Mamaroneck, NY - targeting youth, junior sailors, adults, and executives.

Our America's Cup 12m yachts provide the not to be missed experience with " more complexity and power, a platform that promotes team work and socializing with other teens " an inspiration and gateway to the possibility of bigger and better things as far up in the current pro circuit ranks as the World Match Racing Tour SmileSmileSee: www.worldmatchracingtour.com - the Scott MacLeod founded current PGA style - ISAF sanctioned World Championship of Sailing.

Our goal at 12mYDF -with the help of our patrons, benefactors, "Who's Who" Sailing Advisory Committee and educational and industry sailing alliances is to build out a new bench mark in educational "big boat-hands on" sailing under our 501c3 educational/charitable mission to "acquire, restore and preserve historic America' s Cup 12m Yachts and their "match racing" heritage" with former AmCup Stars and sailing pros right here on a roving basis in Long Island Sound.

We look forward to your continued support and may the wind come up and the sun shining brightly on all of us ........as we weather the current storm.

Best regards, Patrick

Patrick J. Sikorski
Executive Director / Trustee
12m Yacht Development Foundation
10 Homewood Lane, Darien, Connecticut 06820 USA
O: 203-656-1182 C: 203-918-5271
E1:psikorski@optonline.net W: www.12mYDF.com


Patrick J. Sikorski
Director - Worldwide Venue Development
World Match Racing Tour
t: +1-203-656-1182
c:+1-203-918-5271
psikorski@optonline.net
www.worldmatchracingtour.com
www.sail.tv



ZoumUSA
**

Mar 25, 2009, 4:42 PM

Post #20 of 20 (22036 views)
Shortcut
Re: [AJM] The Soccerization of Sailing [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

I raced for 7 years in my 20's and that was enough for me. I learned to sail and now we charter bareboat a couple of weeks per year. It would be great to throw off the dock lines that hold me to civilization but that is unlikely- so my wife has made it clear. Now my son, he may do it. I introduced him to sailing 1 1/2 years ago. He still has 2 1/2 years in the White Fleet. It is hard to imagine he'll be sailing an opti in 6 years but he could. My feeling is he gets to go out every weekend and race and travel miles in his own little boat (a Zoum Optimist Racer) with his own little hands. I wish I could go back and do that. Not because I want to sail everyday today, but because he likes it. Don't you get the feeling we over think things? Anyway, 30 years ago sailing was for the elite, now more people have access than ever before. I have friends in Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, England, Ireland, Sweden, & Finland with kids in Optis. It is great! When was the last time someone said they're worried about burning out their kid by letting him ride his bike?





Viewing the Forums: No members and guests
 
 


Search for (options) Contact Forum Forum FAQS Markup Tags Forum Rules