Scuttlebutt Website SCUTTLEBUTT
SAILING NEWS
ForumIndex CLASSIFIED ADS Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG IN         

Forum Index: .: Dock Talk:
Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016)
Team McLube

 

 


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:40 AM

Post #1 of 10 (20941 views)
Shortcut
Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) Log-In to Post/Reply

From Gary Edelman, Sail America:

Nice job on the editorial "Something to Think About" (‘Butt 4016), and very timely given the US Sailing "Leadership Forum" begins today with registration. Hopefully, some of the questions and issues you raise will be substantively dealt with.

I read the article and a few related articles I had missed in sailingscuttlebutt.com. (inlands, and promoting keelboat racing, etc.). A couple of thoughts given I work for Sail America in a position that is charged with helping to grow the sport - these are my thoughts and not those of Sail America. And really just to point some things out that you may not be aware of.

US Sailing commissioned a committee headed by Don Glassel of Chicago to put together a keelboat curriculum based on the program in Annapolis (can't remember the name off-hand). Despite having raised some funds to help defray costs, Don couldn't get it printed/published.

Candace Porter has been a tireless promoter of the Inlands and sailing, and especially youth sailing. But I attended a "Winter Inlands" where a workshop was titled "The Community Sailor - Do We Need Him?". I think that says it all.

I totally agree that 2 of the best features of events like the AC, the Olympics and the Volvo Ocean Race are the trickle down technology, and the goals they help us set and hopefully achieve. However getting there for most of us is way out of the question, no matter how good we are. Read on

And one of the main problems is sponsorship. Larry Ellison doesn't need a sponsor. But as great a sailor as Reynolds is, he needed financial help. In the US corporations are not as easily tapped for "ideas, dreams and concept", as they are in Europe and other places. Is this made worse by some sort of nationalistic bias ? Possibly. (How readily would a US corp. or wealthy donor support a not yet proven challenger and find out that 90% or more of the crew comes from outside the US ?)

Some years ago at Strictly Sail Pacific Roy Disney stopped in with more than a trailer but less than the full version of Morning Light, along with crew members and coaches. During the Q & A Bill Goggins, CEO of Harken asked Mr. Disney what his thoughts were on growing the sport. Disney's response was that he was a film maker. That was up to the people assembled (many were from the industry as exhibitors at the boat show) to figure out.

And I guess we're still trying.


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:42 AM

Post #2 of 10 (20937 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Bill Canfield:

Possibly one of the biggest reasons Americans are being left behind in the Olympics, Americas' Cup and Volvo is lack of opportunity (and training). At Key West, Dobbs Davis lead a group discussion on future trends in sailing and one of the big points that the panel agreed on was young American sailors had a difficult time getting involved in larger boat programs and even one designs like Melges 20 because there is simply not enough space on board the limited US programs to create the opportunities necessary to get our young sailors involved.

Programs like Oakcliff Sailing Center and Chicago Match Race Center (I'm sure there are others) are doing quite a bit training interns on larger boats involving them in maintenance, sail repairs etc. but they are few and far between. The TP 52 class was represented at the discussion group and it was admitted that class is made up of gray hairs and rock stars. The representative rightfully stated the loads are just too great to allow for much training on these boats. I know one of the big concerns facing the All American Offshore Team doing the Volvo is not finding good sailors but rather good sailors who can make the necessary fixes to sails, hydraulics, winches etc. while at sea. Are other countries doing this type of training better than the US?

We are starting to read about young sailors from different countries signing Americas' Cup contracts but no Americans as yet. Hopefully Larry Ellison will create some sort of nationality rule to open a few doors for American sailors and at the same time bring a national spirit back to the event.


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:44 AM

Post #3 of 10 (20936 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Gail M. Turluck, Lake Michigan Sail Racing Federation:

Great minds think alike! We here at LMSRF have been working up a publicity instructional program/guideline. Yours is golden, though, as you have the contact names and email addresses!!

The hard part is implementation. I get it, do it, sometimes even see results from applying it! Every club needs to be promoting in as many ways as they can. This is something that rarely occurs anymore. I’m still chewing on how to guide more people to apply this information and consistently! Thank you for sharing.





ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:44 AM

Post #4 of 10 (20935 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Charles Doane:

You're kidding, right? The Vendee Globe is not a prominent mountain in our sport? Or is that only because Americans have a hard time finishing it, never mind winning it?

There is a serious argument to be made that the Vendee Globe is the most prominent mountain in our sport. It is certainly the hardest to climb. What does it say about the state of American sailing that you, and so many others, don't consider it to be prominent?


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:45 AM

Post #5 of 10 (20934 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Jan Pehrson:

To Scuttlebutt, thank you for your continued dedication to our sport. I am impressed also with More Hands on Deck which brings the cruising experience to the public and a new generation. Do you know "Distant Shores" the TV Series ?

But I don't see the point of a nationality clause. Since the Clipper Ships we have been a global fraternity. We are ocean based and land was created so that boats have a place to visit. Why force a port requirement on our teams ??


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:46 AM

Post #6 of 10 (20933 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Nick Kennedy:

I respectfully submit that the Vendee Globe Race is the #1 mountain in Sailing. The Volvo racers are girly-men in comparison to the solo racers.


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:47 AM

Post #7 of 10 (20932 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Geoff Emanuel, Southlake, TX:

What occurred to me from reading your fine article is that one must follow the money when it comes to success in the Volvo, Olympics and the America's Cup.

Mr. Ellison, who I admire greatly for all that he has done for the America's Cup, has had success in no small part because of an extraordinary and beneficial willingness to invest massive a mounts of his and others' cash to win. I'm not sure that winning alone should entitle Ellison or any other victor to establish or eliminate a Nationality Rule. That power should be in the hands of an independent overseer of the event. I do support Nationality and hope it becomes a permanent requirement.

The Volvo Ocean Race has become an arms race funded almost exclusively by European, Middle Eastern and Asian corporations. R.J. Reynolds (Winston) and Disney (Pirates of the Carribean) have been the only modern day US corporate participants. The current American crew is being funded by a Turkey-based company. We need to convince American companies to risk their marketing dollars on an All-American team to expand US sailors' ability to and interest in competing.

All Olympic sports has become a financial arms race funded by both countries and corporations. Few Olympic sailing efforts get significant help. Exceptions include England's team, which receives significant funding from their government. The US Team never has received significant or any such funding other than much-appreciated but, unfortunately, inadequate assistance from US Sailing. The cost of competing for an Olympic berth is now prohibitive for almost all potential competitors without meaningful financial backing.


ms
*****

Feb 6, 2014, 11:53 AM

Post #8 of 10 (20931 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From Capt. Scott Rhoads, www.AdventureHighSchool.org:

I agree with you that America has been lagging behind in sailing at the top levels for a while now. It has been a while since Dennis lead American AC teams in victory and even back from defeat. It created media buzz long before any concept of social media and glued American attention to sailing events for over a decade.

IOR Maxi's crossed the globe with legends like Jim Kilroy and the Kialoa brand making sailors around the world sit up and take notice.

But then the attention in American began to shift. Sailing teams take a long time to build, lots of practice, lots of investment of cash, time and attention. As a nation, we are more attuned to sound bites. Any good video camera man will tell you that you have to switch scenes every few seconds or you will lose your audience. Sailing is not well suited to that kind of attention span.

In sailing we have to work with the crew that we have and make them a better team while our American peers are learning to vote someone off the island. We are bucking a trend.

But have no fear. In the real world, you do not get to vote people off the island. Your boss does not care if your attention span is short - he wants the job done or he hires someone else to do the job. In our school we saw a terrible trend around the time that sailing was loosing it's followers. We saw students who honestly believed that a fishing video game somehow put fish on the shelf in the Safeway Stores. We see less and less of this these days. The real world is coming back again and sailing benefits from this.

Sailing will come back. If you want real, valuable, usable, life skills - sailing will teach them to you and then give you the platform to practice them to a fine art. It takes a real leader to run a racing program, a racing boat, or even a small part of a racing boat. As a nation, we naturally admire true leaders.

I do not think that I will end up with a trickle down foiling 50 mph cat, but I did notice the leadership skills of the top skippers in the AC. I will most likely not have a canting keel on my trip around the world, but I did notice the fierce determination of the Volvo skippers to push boats and crews to the limit and to repair boats and crews when something went wrong.

There are a lot of couch potatos and new "mouse potatos" in the US, but the true competitors are still here and will take a shot at those peaks that you mentioned.

I look forward to seeing Larry Ellison fine tune the AC and hope he does well with it and I am eager to see the Volvo set sail. The Olympics are the top of sporting and have been for a long time. My salute to the events and the sailors in them along with all that we can do to help them and all that we can learn from them.





Bruce Thompson
***

Feb 7, 2014, 5:01 AM

Post #9 of 10 (20827 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply

From the front page we have John Vandemoer making the observation that Stanford has a lot of young women who should be brought into the sport now and in the future. I agree as noted here
http://forum.sailingscuttlebutt.com/..._Girls%21%21_P14860/
So what would I do with Larry Ellison's money?
Assuming one hundred dry mooring spaces at about $1,600 each, I figure the Chicago Park District collects $160,000 annually in fees. So I'd offer them $2,000,000 for a 100 year lease on the dry mooring compounds (figuring an 8% annual return on investment for the Park District). Then I'd let the existing one design fleets run the program. Let them use the balance of the money to buy boats (Lightnings, Rhodes-19s, Vanguard-15s, Lasers and Laser Radials) which they would then bare boat charter to interested candidates.
Women like fashion and colors. So instead of buying a fleet of boring all white Laser Radials, I'd let the charterers pick the colors. If one wants a boat in hot pink, so be it. If she is of Irish descent and wants one in Shamrock Green, you go girl!
And they have the option to join the Chicago Corinthian YC, which hosts those fleets, for $560 annual dues. Combine a $500 charter fee with the $560 dues and she could sail for $1,060 per year. That is about one fifth the cost of buying a new Laser Radial.
By lifting the onerous cost of waterfront access, Larry would make the sport much more accessible to everyone, but particularly young Stanford alumnae. The infrastructure already exists to create an Olympic/Pan American Games center in Chicago. Women successfully compete in Lightnings (see current Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year Jody Starck) and Laser Radials (Anna Tunnicliffe and Paige Railey).
And it would be within walking distance of the Walt Disney Magnet School.
http://www.disney.cps.k12.il.us/


How about it Larry? Throw us some chump change.


The Publisher
*****


Feb 11, 2014, 4:12 PM

Post #10 of 10 (20531 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ms] Something to Think About (Scuttlebutt 4016) [In reply to] Log-In to Post/Reply


In Reply To
From Jan Pehrson:

To Scuttlebutt, thank you for your continued dedication to our sport. I am impressed also with More Hands on Deck which brings the cruising experience to the public and a new generation. Do you know "Distant Shores" the TV Series ?

But I don't see the point of a nationality clause. Since the Clipper Ships we have been a global fraternity. We are ocean based and land was created so that boats have a place to visit. Why force a port requirement on our teams ??


The nationality clause fits into both the current model, and the desired goals. Teams don't enter the AC, Clubs do. Each Club then represents its country. That is the current model. The desired model is to grow fan interest, which is much easier for sports with annual seasons. But events like the Olympics, World Cup Soccer, and the AC, which occur only every 3 to 4 years, and lose fan connection, get an instant boost from nationality branding. Fans like to cheer for their country. The other benefit from a nationality clause would be how it helps the sport in that country. Young sailors gain heroes/mentors, and perhaps a desire to follow in their footsteps.

- Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt


Viewing the Forums: No members and guests
 
 


Search for (options) Contact Forum Forum FAQS Markup Tags Forum Rules